Parallel-Through-The-Road Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Modeling and Simulation by Wayne State University for EcoCAR2

Paper #:
  • 2013-01-0541

Published:
  • 2013-04-08
DOI:
  • 10.4271/2013-01-0541
Citation:
Snyder, K., Lor, L., and Ku, J., "Parallel-Through-The-Road Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Modeling and Simulation by Wayne State University for EcoCAR2," SAE Technical Paper 2013-01-0541, 2013, https://doi.org/10.4271/2013-01-0541.
Pages:
16
Abstract:
The Wayne State University (WSU) EcoCAR2 student team designed, modeled, Model-In-the-Loop (MIL) tested, Software-In-the-Loop (SIL) simulation tested, and Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulation tested the team's conversion design for taking a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu and converting it into a Parallel-Through-The-Road (PTTR) plug-in hybrid.The 2013 Malibu is a conventional Front Wheel Drive (FWD) vehicle and the team's conversion design keeps the conventional FWD and adds a Rear Wheel Drive (RWD) powertrain consisting of an electric motor, a single speed reduction gearbox and a differential to drive the rear wheels -where none of these previously existed on the rear wheels.The RWD addition creates the PTTR hybrid powertrain architecture of two driven axles where the mechanical torque path connection between the two powertrains is through the road, rather than a mechanical torque path through gears, chains, or shafts. Finally, a battery pack and an on-board charger are added to complete the plug-in hybrid vehicle powertrain.This paper covers WSU's PTTR plant modeling and simulation, hybrid supervisory controller code development by the team during the first year of the three year competition.The PTTR hybrid powertrain vehicle architecture modeling is discussed in the plant model development section and the results section show the mixed results for SIL testing the physics of plant modeling for following a drive cycle trace and the resulting fuel consumption.The team wrote and MIL tested their hybrid supervisory control software, skipped SIL testing by going straight to HIL testing. The testing is discussed in the powertrain controls integration methods and results sections, with unsatisfactory results achieved during the HIL test demonstration at the final competition of the first year.Safety critical CAN loss detection is discussed as an example of code the team wrote for the hybrid supervisory controller for vehicle operational safety.
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