Emission Characteristics of Gasoline and LPG in a Spray-Guided-Type Direct Injection Engine

Paper #:
  • 2013-01-1323

Published:
  • 2013-04-08
DOI:
  • 10.4271/2013-01-1323
Citation:
Park, C., Park, Y., Oh, S., Lee, Y. et al., "Emission Characteristics of Gasoline and LPG in a Spray-Guided-Type Direct Injection Engine," SAE Technical Paper 2013-01-1323, 2013, https://doi.org/10.4271/2013-01-1323.
Pages:
13
Abstract:
Nowadays, automobile manufacturers are focusing on reducing exhaust-gas emissions because of their harmful effects on humans and the environment, such as global warming due to greenhouse gases. Direct injection combustion is a promising technology that can significantly improve fuel economy compared to conventional port fuel injection spark ignition engines. However, previous studies indicate that relatively high levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission were produced with gasoline fuel in a spray-guided-type combustion system as a result of the stratified combustion characteristics. Because a lean-burn engine cannot employ a three-way catalyst, NOx emissions can be an obstacle to commercializing a lean-burn direct injection engine.Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fuel was proposed as an alternative for reducing NOx emission because it has a higher vapor pressure than gasoline and decreases the local rich mixture region as a result of an improved mixing process. The combustion and emission characteristics of LPG and gasoline fuels were compared in a multi-cylinder engine with a spray-guided-type combustion system. A lower NOx emission value could be achieved with a single injection of LPG, while the hydrocarbon emissions increased.
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