Vibration Fatigue for Chassis Mounted Cantilevered Component

Paper #:
  • 2017-01-0360

Published:
  • 2017-03-28
Abstract:
Vehicle chassis mounted cantilevered components should meet two critical design targets-NVH criterion to avoid resonance with road nose and engine vibration and satisfied durability performance to avoid any incident in structure failure and dysfunction. Generally, two types of testing are performed to validate chassis mounted cantilevered component in design process, shaker table test and real proving ground test. Shaker table test is a powered vibration endurance test performed in a shaker table with load input summarized from real proving ground data and accurate enough to replicate the physical test. The proving ground test is only performed in critical milestones with full vehicle driving to get detailed response. So most tests are simplified lab test to save cost and effort. How to apply CAE to virtually replicate these lab test, like shaker table test for chassis mounted cantilevered components, is even more helpful in design verification before and after lab test. How to reasonably define load input-Power Spectral Density or Sine Sweep, to predict the fatigue life of chassis component will be discussed according to structure feature and location. CAE process for this topic with air suspension air compressor support bracket as an example is presented for vibration stress and fatigue set up to predict and correlate with vibration shaker table key life test.
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