Correlating Laboratory Oil Coking Rig Tests to Diesel Engine Tests to Understand the Mechanisms Responsible for Turbocharger Compressor Coking

Paper #:
  • 2017-01-0887

Published:
  • 2017-03-28
Abstract:
Deposit formation on the turbocharger compressor housing can lead to compressor efficiency degradation, which leads to loss of fuel economy and increase in CO2 and NOx emissions. To understand the role that engine oil composition and formulation play in these deposits which arise from oil aerosols and particulates from the closed crankcase ventilation, fIve different lubricants were run in a fired engine test to evaluate turbocharger compressor efficiency. Basestock group, additive package, and viscosity modifier treat rate were varied in the lubricants tested. After each test was completed the turbocharger compressor cover and backplate deposits were characterized. A laboratory oil mist coking rig has also been constructed, which generated deposits having the same characteristics as those from the engine tests. By analyzing results from both lab and engine tests, correlations between deposit characteristics and their effect on compressor efficiency were observed. The physical and mechanical characteristics of these deposits, as well as parameters affecting deposit formation such as the chemistry of the oil formulations, oil aerosol particle sizes, and mass of oil mist flow are discussed. The rough/smooth and dry/wet qualities of the deposits were found to correlate most with compressor efficiency loss; thickness and mass of deposits did not correlate.
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