An Introduction to How Low Speed Pre Ignition Affects Engine Components

Paper #:
  • 2017-01-1042

Published:
  • 2017-03-28
Abstract:
Current market demands in conjunction with increased emission legislation's, have OEM’s striving to improve fuel economy and reduce CO2 emissions. One way to meet these demands, is through engine downsizing. Engine downsizing allows for reduced pumping and frictional losses. However, to maintain drivability, specifically in trucks and SUV's, power density increase through the addition of either a turbocharger or supercharger is necessary. Furthermore, engine efficiencies have been improved through reduced engine speed, paired with high gear count transmissions, providing an opportunity for manufactures to achieve desired drivability (strong acceleration coupled with fuel efficient high gears for cruising). With these advancements taken to improve engine/vehicle efficiency, gasoline turbo charge direct injected (GTDI) engines operate at low engine speeds with high torque output. This operating condition results in an environment within the combustion chamber which has the propensity to experience a disruptive abnormal combustion event known as low speed pre-ignition (LSPI). This phenomenon has the potential to catastrophically damage the power cylinder assembly; therefore, OEM's are working to eliminate LSPI and design components to survive if LSPI occurs. Within this paper we will discuss what MAHLE has learned about LSPI through advanced research and engine testing. Along with advancements that MAHLE has made to the power cylinder components to withstand LSPI as well as minimize or eliminate the propensity for LSPI to occur.
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