Accelerated Lab Test Methodology for Steering Gearbox Bracket Using Fatigue Damage and Reliability Correlation

Paper #:
  • 2017-01-9177

Published:
  • 2017-04-11
Abstract:
In the modern automotive sector, durability and reliability are the typically pronounced words. Customers are expecting a highly reliable product at low cost. Any product that fails within its useful life tends to lower the customer satisfaction as well as the reputation of the manufacturer. To eradicate this, all automotive components undergo stringent validation protocol in proving ground or lab testing. This project aims at creating an accelerated lab test methodology for steering gearbox bracket by simulating field failure. Potential failure causes were analyzed and road load data acquisition(RLDA) carried out at customer site as well as Proving Ground(PG) to understand the severity of fatigue damage. To simulate the field failure, lab test facility was developed by reproducing similar boundary conditions as in vehicle. Based on cumulative damage analysis, customized lab test sequence was developed and field failure was simulated in the existing design samples. Reliability analysis was carried out and reliable life in lab test was correlated with the field. Lab cycle target for the intended vehicle life was derived by comparing fatigue damage and reliability correlation. Improved design of steering gearbox bracket was validated in the same test conditions and compared with the life of existing design.
Also in:
  • SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles - V126-2EJ
  • SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles - V126-2
Topic:
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