Evaluation of Different Turbocharger Configurations for a Heavy-Duty Partially Premixed Combustion Engine

Paper #:
  • 2017-24-0164

Published:
  • 2017-09-04
Abstract:
The engine concept Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) has proved higher efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and spark ignition gasoline engines (SI). The relatively simple implementation of the concept is an advantage, however, high pumping losses has made its use challenging in multi-cylinder heavy duty (HD) engines. With high rates of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to dilute the charge and hence limit the combustion rate, the resulting exhaust temperatures are low. The selected boost system must therefore be efficient which could lead to large, complex and costly solutions. In the presented work experiments and modeling were combined to evaluate different turbocharger configurations for the PPC concept. Experiments were performed on a multi-cylinder Scania D13 engine. The engine was modified to incorporate long route EGR and a single stage turbocharger, however, with externally compressed air being optionally supplied to the compressor. Experimental combustion heat release rates and boundary conditions were used to validate a one-dimensional (1D) simulation model. This model was then used to compare three different turbochargers, two single-stage turbochargers and one two-stage turbocharger. The whole speed and load range was covered in the simulations to determine the engine performance. The effect of charge air cooler (CAC) and EGR cooler temperatures was also investigated. The results show that the validated model agrees well with the experiments. The matching process resulted in two smaller single-stage turbochargers and one larger two-stage turbocharger. The two-stage turbocharger was able to give the highest load over the whole speed range with a brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) of 25.6 bar, whereas the two single-stage turbochargers reached 18.9 bar and 20.7 bar respectively. The brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was similar for all turbochargers with a minimum of 182 g/kWh. The results also show that decreasing the inlet temperature is critical for high system efficiencies.
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