Opportunities for plug-in electric vehicles to participate in ride hailing fleets

Paper #:
  • 2018-01-0667

Published:
  • 2018-04-03
Abstract:
Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) are disrupting personal mobility by satisfying travel demand without the need of personally owned vehicles. Such services have potential to curb automobile ownership and use, decrease environmental externalities per household and contribute to increasing transit ridership. On the other hand, TNCs can potentially increase traffic, particularly during peak periods, and vehicle miles travelled, due to deadheading mileage for picking up or “searching” for customers. Electrification of TNC vehicles is considered as one avenue for mitigating the potentially negative energy and environmental outcomes of growth in the ride hailing industry. This paper deploys a heuristic algorithm to emulate operation of electric vehicles within a TNC fleet using a large GPS dataset from Columbus, OH. Charging infrastructure requirements supporting operation of electric vehicles within a TNC fleet are simulated using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection Tool (EVI-Pro). Preliminary simulations suggest that the TNC fleet reduces vehicle ownership and increases daily vehicle miles on a per-vehicle basis. Shorter dwell times and higher daily driving distances result in increased charging infrastructure requirements. Although this preliminary analysis of the impacts of new mobility paradigms on alternative fueling infrastructure requirements has produced several key results, the complexity of the problem warrants further investigation.
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