A METHOD OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS FOR CASE-HARDENED AUTOMOTIVE POWERTRAIN COMPONENTS

Paper #:
  • 2018-01-1064

Published:
  • 2018-04-03
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Abstract:
Analyzing the behavior of a mechanical structure with a case-hardened layer encompassing a relative soft material represents a overwhelming demand and practical problem. It is a common practice in certain industries (for example, massive production of automobile industry) that many mechanical parts are made from mild steel via stamping operation, which yields great productivity and high utilization of material. To increase mechanical strength and wear-resistance, some sorts of surface hardening are often applied to metal-formed parts of mild steel, for example, by heat treatment, to turn a thin layer into very hardened one on the outside. As a result, these parts, when eventually installed in machines or automobiles, are nothing but laminated structures. Historically, Modeling multi-laminated sheets stemmed from needs for light-weight, strong non-metallic material in aerospace [1]. Aircraft bodies are usually comprised of sheets or panels whose thickness is relative thin with respect to their length and width. Thus, it is justified that the multi-layer structure is modeled as shell elements within which each layer contributes to the overall stiffness by its own ply properties. However, the case-hardened bodies in this study are much chunkier. It is necessary to employ a different methodology to address the analysis of its mechanical behavior. It is proposed that inside core of metal part is enclosed all the way with special 3-dimensional solid elements, known as layered solid elements, to model thin layers of hard materials. In the past, there also existed the finite element model of what was classified as multilayer work-pieces with interaction with rigid balls or cones, in investigation of the elastoplastic behavior of indentation test. Gamonpilas & Busso [2] studied the effect of substrate on the characteristics of coated solids when indented by an example of 2-dimensional finite element model. In the work conducted by Amaya-Roncancio at al [3], chromic coated solids were modeled as multilayer films with the thickness ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 micrometer, in the analysis of a conical Berkovich indentation process. Jia et al [4] proposed to treat tooth enamel as bilayer in a study of its cyclic indentation. The indentation load could lead to high plasticity if severely loaded. In general, its deformation is mostly compressive and highly localized in a relative small region. In contrast, the system in this investigation is subject to broader loads it normally encounters in high rotating systems. Understanding of the behavior will have great bearing on the improved durability life of such a system.
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