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Viewing 85381 to 85410 of 86934
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370184
C. L. Bouchard, C. Fayette Taylor, E. S. Taylor
IN the investigations reported in this paper flame-trace photographs were taken on a moving film through a glass-window slot in an engine cylinder to show the effects of various operating conditions on the rate of flame travel across the combustion-chamber. The tests were made with a small L-head single-cylinder engine in the Sloan Automotive Laboratories at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The technique is similar to that used by Withrow and Boyd in flame studies reported in 1931. This investigation covers a considerable range of operating conditions, including altitude, with and without supercharging, inlet temperature, humidity of the intake air, engine speed, ignition timing, and fuel-air ratio. In general, the results show that flame speed decreases with increasing altitude in an unsupercharged engine. Either supercharging or reducing the exhaust pressure with inlet pressure constant, tends to increase flame speed.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370187
H. A. Everett
OILS from three different crudes, matched as to initial viscosity but with widely different viscosity indexes, gave markedly different values when tested in an oiliness machine. As viscosity index indicates temperature effects only, the effect of pressure on viscosity was investigated in a high-pressure viscometer. For each oil, values up to 50,000 lb. per sq. in. pressure were obtained and for three temperatures. From these data characteristic curves were plotted giving complete pressure, viscosity, and temperature (P.Z.T.) relations. Using such curves it was possible to trace the changes in viscosity which each oil underwent in its passage through the bearing and obtain an estimate for equivalent viscosity. When this investigation was made the different so-called “oiliness” effects were shown to be but the normal effect of the true viscosity actually existing in the oil film.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370189
G. L. Neely
THE purpose of this paper is to call attention to the need for fundamental wear investigations and to show that wear does not correlate with oiliness. A testing machine suitable for measuring both friction and wear is described. The machine, which is a modification of one previously reported by the author, uses two sets of frictional surfaces - one in the form of a track having two concentric rails and the other consisting of three small buttons with recessed centers and flat tracks on the outer edges. An important feature of the machine is that the rubbing surfaces are maintained automatically at an almost uniform degree of surface smoothness by the lapping action produced by the combined rotating and sliding motion of the buttons.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370190
C. E. Zwahl
A DETAILED report of the results obtained testing hypoid lubricants at the Chevrolet Motor Co. is presented in this paper. As a result of these tests it is announced that 182 hypoid lubricants have been put on the Chevrolet approved list. Seeking to correct an impression that only lead soap-active sulphur and lead soap-sulphur saponifiable-chlorine lubricants would be considered, the author states that other types that meet specifications also will be put on the approved list. Nine different characteristics are checked in the laboratory tests: load-carrying properties; viscosity; chemical analysis to determine the total lead, sulphur, and chlorine; oxidation; evaporation loss; non-combustible sediment; channeling; foaming; and copper-strip test. Scoring tests were conducted over a 3.8-mile speed loop in the proving ground at speeds varying from 10 to 70 m.p.h., and a new third member was used for each test of each lubricant.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370191
Floyd Patras
BUS maintenance grew from haphazard patch-work repairs. Shortage of vehicles compelled stocking of service units. Standardization of equipment never has been accomplished. With competent mechanics not obtainable, they must be trained in bus work. Card files and other records now keep track of performance of every unit and all major parts. Service expectancy cannot always be based on the past performance of the part. Complete inspection of all parts is periodically necessary. Taxes make large numbers of standby buses economically impossible. High mileages are obtainable from modern buses. Rear engine locations are popular with the public. Larger and better oil and air filters are needed; the same is true of oil coolers. Lubrication is not a problem. All worn parts now pass through the salvage department. Most units on modern coaches are of ample size and cause little trouble. Hypoids operate satisfactorily.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370005
Neil MacCoull
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370004
Milton K. McLeod
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370007
George Miller
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370002
L. P. SAUNDERS
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370012
Howard D. Brown
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370015
Harry G. Davis
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370014
V.P. Rumely
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370009
A. W. Pope
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370008
C. D. Peterson
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370011
F. C. Pyper
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370010
Ralph Powers
ABSTRACT
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370023
Thomas H. Henkle
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370022
S. O. White
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370016
C. G. Anthony
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370026
C. M. LARSON
Since the publication of the original Classification of Transmission and Rear Axle Lubricants back in 1931, evolution has seen the development of a most complicated and varied number of gear lubricant recommendations for the millions of cars now on our highways. Each year as new features are introduced, changes are made which affect gear lubricant requirements of the past. Yet nothing is done to revise car manufacturers' lubrication charts made up previously each year. A composite grouping of gear lubricants would simplify the servicing of cars on the road. At the present time, the service station attendant is required to follow with exactness lubrication charts for each and every make and model of car if he would keep the car owner out of trouble. On the other hand, the service station needs are best filled by the smallest number of grades required for proper servicing since large inventories and especially gear lubricant dispensing equipment (metered) are costly.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370027
W. F. Bird
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370030
LACEY V MURROW
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370025
Sidney Oldberg, Maynard Yeasting, Max M. Roensch
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370031
George M. Maverick
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370028
H. C. REYNOLDS
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370029
CHAS. A. WINSLOW
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370034
Ivan L. Shogran