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Viewing 1 to 30 of 104293
2015-07-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9110
Klementina Gerova, Anthony Savill
Abstract The simulation of heat exchanger air flow characteristics using Computational Fluid Dynamics requires knowledge of the experimental pressure drop across the element concerned. This is normally achieved through wind tunnel testing of either full scale heat exchangers or by using laminations of various porous materials and honeycombs to represent these. The current paper both continues and compliments prior work published by the lead author, which entailed a series of measurements of the pressure drop in both the near and far field, across screens with porosity (β) in the range 0.41 < β < 0.76. This experimental investigation established a relationship between the porosity and the pressure drop characteristics of a given material at various angles of inclination to the free-stream flow. In addition, the effect of screen depth was investigated using honeycombs.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2136
Francisco José Redondo
Due to weight constraints, the engine air intake for the Airbus A400M Transport Airplane will be all made in aluminum, and by specification, the intake is protected against ice accretion by a hot air system. In order to assure a fatigue life of the element for the life of the airplane, the temperature of the air supplied must be controlled to a maximum value consistent with aluminum characteristics. A system has been designed wherein hot air is bled and cooled by coolant air from inside the nacelle with a jet pump.While maximum temperature was a constraint for the design of the system, several other constraints appeared during the detailed design of the system; - the tight space allocation inside the nacelle limited the length of the jet pump, - the low temperature provided by the engine bleed in flight idle limited the secondary flow used to cool the engine bleed, and - the complex air distribution needed to supply air to the intake areas. Two variants of the system were developed.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2135
Martin Schulz, Michael Sinapius
A designer of a new mechanical ice protection system for airplanes needs to know how much and in which way he has to deform the surface to break off the ice. The ice adhesion strength is often used as design value. To measure the adhesive strength several methods have been published. This paper presents a review about those methods and discusses the way the adhesion strength is derived. Finite Element Method is used to give a good insight into the stress state at failure for different load cases. The implication of these illustrations is that equations which use only ultimate force and total interfacial area to calculate adhesion strength miss the local stress state at the crack tip and the complex process of crack growing. Hence the derived adhesion strength may not be comparable with others, because they depend in fact on neglected parameters like specimen size, substrate thickness and stiffness.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2144
James MacLeod, Michael Clarke, Doug Marsh
The GLACIER Icing Facility – Lessons Learnt in the first Five Years of Operation J.D. MacLeod M. Clarke National Research Council of Canada Rolls-Royce plc Gas Turbine Laboratory Civil Aerospace Ottawa, ON Derby, UK Abstract The Global Aerospace Centre for Icing and Environmental Research Inc. (GLACIER) facility is located in Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. This facility provides icing certification tests for large gas turbine engines, as well as performance, endurance and other gas turbine engine qualification testing. This globally unique outdoor engine test and certification facility was officially opened back in 2010. The prime purpose of this facility is for icing certification of aero gas turbines. The facility provides the aviation industry with the required environmental conditions (by virtue of its location), and the capability to meet the growing demands for icing certifications and other adverse cold weather conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2137
Daniel R. Adriaansen, Paul Prestopnik, George McCabe, Marcia Politovich
Advancements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) modeling continue to enhance the quality of in-flight icing forecasts and diagnoses. When performing a diagnosis of current in-flight icing conditions, observational datasets can be combined with NWP model output to form a more accurate representation. These diagnoses are traditionally tied to a three-dimensional grid, typically the grid of the NWP model data chosen for use. Surface observations are heavily relied upon when performing in-flight icing diagnoses to identify cloud coverage and cloud base height above observing stations. One of the major challenges of using these point-based or otherwise limited observations of cloud properties is extending the influence of the observation to nearby points on the grid. For example, we seek an improved solution to the problem of combining point-based METARs observations with NWP model grids over the current method.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2291
Pandurang Maruti Jadhav, Sandesh A Dunung, Pravin T Nitnaware
There are many environmental issues in India. Air pollution, water pollution, garbage, vibration & noise pollution and pollution of the natural environment are all challenges for India. India has a long way to go to reach environmental quality similar to those enjoyed in developed economies. Pollution remains a major challenge and opportunity for India. The review of trends in farm practices and machinery development suggests that vibration & noise problems are still prevalent in agricultural situations, even though there has been a steady increase in the availability of materials and equipment for vibration & noise control over recent years. Diesel engine is the main source of power for agricultural equipments, such as water pump set, compressor, electric generator and tractor. Even it is one of the sources of vibration & noise in agricultural field. There is reluctance of the agricultural sector to use of vibration & noise control methods.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2297
Insoo Jung, Jaemin Jin, Kwangmin Won, Seungwook Yang, Kyoungdoug Min, Hoimyung Choi
Combustion noise of diesel engine can be deteriorated by combustion characteristics that are influenced by the factors such as engnine NVH durability, driving conditions, environmental factors and fuel properties. Therefore we need to develop robust combustion noise to be insensitive to the factors. To achieve this purpose, the method for combustion characteristics prediction has been developed by means of analyzing vibration signal measured from engine cylinder block. The closed-loop control by controlling injection parameters through combustion characteristics prediction has been carried out to make combustion characteristics that we want to exhibit. We have also evaluated the effect of combustion noise and fuel consumption by applying the closed-loop control.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2310
Edward Ray Green
The Sound Transmission Loss of automotive intake and exhaust components is commonly measured using the four microphone tube method per ASTM E2611. Often area adapters are used to match the component tube to that of the tube apparatus. These area adapters affect the Sound Transmission Loss measurement, especially at very low frequencies. The use of the Transfer Matrix Technique to remove the affect of the area adapters is described. The improvements for step and cone area adapters are compared.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2317
Zhenlin Ji, Yiliang Fan
A simulation program named as MAP (Muffler Analysis Program) is developed for the rapid calculation and analysis of acoustic characteristics of duct muffling systems. The program is based on the plane wave theory and uses the Visual Basic 6.0 to create a friendly GUI (Graphic User Interface) for input of the geometrical and physical parameters to build and modify the duct muffling systems quickly. The relation among the duct acoustic elements is established by using the transfer matrix method, and the Transmission Loss (TL) and Insertion Loss (IL) may be calculated, and then the results are plotted in terms of curve. Map allows designer to change parameters of the duct muffling systems expediently, to investigate the effects of design changes on the acoustic characteristics and finally to get an acceptable solution.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2311
Aditya Palsule, Arun Budama, Nandakumar Somasundaraeswer
Development of split Catcon-Muffler system was done to be used in front engine low floor (FELF) bus from perspective of cost saving, modularity and reduction in complexity. This system is developed as an alternate to an existing solution of integrated Catcon and muffler. The paper describes the development of a split Catcon and muffler exhaust system for a FELF bus, so as to meet cost and time considerations. The development had to achieve a feasible muffler + catalytic converter solution, which could be installed within the packaging volume of the existing configuration, while meeting the regulatory requirements for Pass by noise (PBN), and at the same time conforming to backpressure limits set for optimum engine performance. Multiple design – prototypes – test iterations were carried out to meet the PBN and back pressure target of engine. The final solution was developed which achieved both the requirements within the specified space constraints.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2329
Paolo Di Francescantonio, Charles Hirsch, Piergiorgio Ferrante, Katsutomo Isono
The prediction of the broadband noise generated by the flow interaction with solid bodies such as for example side mirror noise, exhaust pipe noise, or ventilation and air conditioning noise require in principle the execution of extremely high demanding unsteady CFD simulations that nowadays cannot be afforded in an industrial environment. Therefore research efforts have been focused on alternative approaches that could permit to obtain engineering accurate results with much reduced computational efforts by stochastically reconstructing the turbulent velocity field starting from a steady RANS analysis. Two main families of methods have been introduced up to now, SNGR [1], and RPM[2], but applications in industrial environment are still limited mainly due to the lack of reliability of these methods and the need to introduce some tuning parameters.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2341
Marc Ingelmann, Holger Bickelmann
BASF supplies the automotive industry with parts made of the Micro-cellular Polyurethane Elastomer - Cellasto®, a material with unique characteristics in NVH applications. For over 50 years our automotive customers are relying on our materials, with the Jounce Bumper being our best known applications. Top mounts and coil-spring-isolators are also a key offering to the industry. A lot of functions in automotive and non-automotive products are using Cellasto® as damping element, such as armrests, seats, torque-dampers, handheld machines etc. The dynamic performance of Cellasto , combined with the ability to work in limited packages, makes it the ideal choice. The amplitude selective damping fits to the automotive requirements: small amplitudes are generating a low damping of the material; high amplitudes are increasing the damping.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2361
Sajjad Beigmoradi
Nowadays, by the introduction of significant advances in automotive industries, noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), in the position of the main comfort attribute, plays a crucial role in marketing and passenger satisfaction. In order to cope NVH problems, three main actions are taken by NVH engineers for reducing perceived level of noise in cabin: Noise reduction in sources, Noise path treatment and Noise control at receiver. Among these approaches, those pertain to modification of noise pass, through structure and air, to the cabin are more prevalent in automotive applications. Accordingly, identification of noise paths that dominantly contribute to sound and vibration transfer to cabin phenomenon should be dealt with importance. In practice, engine vibration transmitted through sub-frame attachments to body can induce high level of noise and vibration to the passenger cabin.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2359
Craig Reynolds, Jason Blough, Carl Anderson, Mark Johnson, Jean Schweitzer
Sound power is commonly estimated using either a reverberant chamber or an anechoic environment as described by the ISO 3741:2012 and ISO 3744:2012 standards respectively. Both methods require the volume of the noise source to be less than 1% of the chamber volume leading to a requirement of relatively large test chambers. Torque converter cavitation noise testing in an enclosed metallic test fixture violates both standards due to volume and/or space requirements. This paper describes a new method developed to accurately determine torque converter sound power through characterization of the test environment. Two types of reference noise sources were created to represent torque converter geometries and noise output. A tweeter was used to output broadband high frequency noise typical of cavitation noise. The first source consisted of the torque converter cover and tweeter only. The second used the cover and pump with a tweeter in place of the turbine, stator, and clutch.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2162
Krzysztof Szilder, Edward Lozowski
Atmospheric icing resulting from freezing rain, freezing drizzle and freezing cloud droplets occurs when airborne supercooled water drops freeze on objects they encounter. This process is especially hazardous to aircraft, when the build-up of ice changes the stability and control characteristics of the aerodynamic surfaces. Ice can also be shed with disastrous consequences, if it is ingested into engines, strikes the aircraft or leads to unbalanced aerodynamics forces. Ice accretion is a complex phenomenon involving 3-D multi-phase flow, heat transfer, and gravitational, viscous, surface tension and shear forces. An ability to predict how ice accretes on engineering structures is essential to the prediction of its associated aerodynamic penalties. We have developed an original icing modelling capability, called the “morphogenetic” approach, based on a discrete formulation and emulation of ice formation physics.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2246
Kurt Veggeberg, Mike Denton
This is an overview of the development of a portable, real-time sound camera based on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) and digital microphones for noise source identification. The use of the FPGA technology and digital microphones provides increased performance, reduced cost and weight. This provides the capability of making interior noise measurements. Microphone arrays can be a useful tool in identifying noise sources and give designers an image of noise distribution. There are many successful applications of noise source identification systems in use in the automotive industry which will be presented. The beamforming algorithm is a classic and efficient algorithm for signal processing of microphone arrays and is the core of many microphone array systems. High-speed real-time beamforming has not been implemented much in a portable instrument because it requires large computational resources.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2253
Kimitoshi Tsuji, Katsuhiko Yamamoto
It is important for vehicle concept planning to estimate fuel economy and the influence of vehicle vibration in advance, on virtual engine specifications and a virtual vehicle frame. In this paper, I will show the power plant model with electrical starter, battery and alternator that can predict transient torque and combustion heat results. Also vibration result with the power plant model connected to vehicle inertia model will be shown. The power plant was 1.3L 4cyl NA. The discussed vehicle was small size and 1300kg. The power plant model was realized by energy based model using VHDL-AMS. Here, VHDL-AMS is modelling language stored in IEC international standard (IEC61691-6) and can realize multi physics on 1D simulation. The modeling language supports electrical, magnetic, thermal, mechanical, fluidic and compressive fluidic domain. The model was created in house by fully VHDL-AMS and validated on ANSYS SIMPLORER.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2230
Chatter vibrations are causing large monetary losses daily in industry. New materials have increased the challenges with harmful vibration levels. Since the vibrations, when observed as a final result, are chaotic and the vibration process nonlinear, it is a challenging task to deal with it. It is also a common “understanding” in the cutting industry that chatter is RPM (the rotational speed) dependent, since the behavior changes with RPM. Many attempts have been done over many years to mitigate and understand the vibrations. In our vast research on these topics, we have found that it is rewarding to classify the vibrations into categories, enabling a better understanding of its underlying physics and “source of vibrations,” and thus also the formulation of a possible remedy. An analysis approach has been developed where vibrations are analyzed and categorized and a GO/NOGO indicator is telling if the machine has the “right type of vibrations.”
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2237
Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Sergey Medyanik
Structural-Acoustic Joints for Incompatible Models in the Energy Finite Element Analysis Sergey Medyanik, Michigan Engineering Services, LLC Nickolas Vlahopoulos, University of Michigan In the EFEA method, the governing differential equations are formulated for an energy variable that has been spatially averaged over a wavelength and time averaged over a period. Differential equations are derived for all wave bearing domains within a system. Each differential equation represents a power balance over a control volume. The corresponding fundamental solutions vary exponentially with space, thus requiring only a small number of elements to capture numerically the smooth spatial variation. Joint matrices are required between the finite elements at locations where discontinuities in the primary EFEA variables exist.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2280
Bernd Philippen, Roland Sottek
Transfer Path Analysis and Synthesis is a widely-used troubleshooting and engineering method in the development process of a car. An engine TPA model should include the engine mounts because they are important elements of the structure-borne paths from the engine to the driver’s ears. This allows identifying if the structure, the sound radiation or the mount is a weak point of the transmission. A mount can be characterized, e. g., by a mount attenuation function, a four-pole model, or a simple parametric mount model. If the mount characteristics are known, the influence of a different mount on the structure-borne sound can be virtually predicted without a real modification. The mount characteristics could be determined on special test rigs but the transferability to the real situation is often questionable because the same boundary conditions on the test rig and in the car are difficult to guarantee.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2076
Caroline Laforte, Neal Wesley, Marc Mario Tremblay
Abstract This study presents a new method to evaluate and compare the anti-icing performance, i.e., the ability to delay the reformation of ice, of runways and taxiways deicing/anti-icing fluids (RDF) under icing precipitation, based on the skid resistance values, obtained with the Portable Skid Resistance Tester (PSRT). In summary, the test consists of applying, on a standardized concrete pavement sample, a given quantity of de-icing fluid. Following this application, the concrete sample is submitted to low freezing drizzle intensities, in a cold chamber at −5.0 ± 0.3°C. The skid resistance of concrete is measured at 5 minute intervals, until the concrete becomes completely iced. The anti-icing performance of 5 different fluids, both experimental and commercial, was assessed in comparison with a reference solution of 50% w/w K-formate. The anti-icing performance is analyzed based on two parameters: the duration (Icing Protection Time, IPT) and the effectiveness of this protection.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2078
Alric Rothmayer, Hui Hu
Abstract A strong air/water interaction theory is used to develop a fast simplified model for the trapping of water in a film that flows over sub-grid surface roughness. The sub-grid model is used to compute correction factors that can alter mass transport within the film. The sub-grid model is integrated into a covariant film mass transport model of film flow past three-dimensional surfaces in a form that is suitable for use in aircraft icing codes. Sample calculations are presented to illustrate the application of the model.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2079
Colin Hatch, Jason Moller, Eleftherios Kalochristianakis, Ian Roberts
Abstract The introduction of ice-phobic coatings promises to allow passive ice protection systems to be developed particularly for rotating systems such as propellers. The centrifugal force field combined with reduced adhesive strength can produce a self-shed capability limiting the amount of ice build-up. The size and shed time of ice shed from a propeller is predicted using a process that determines ice shape, ice growth rate and both internal and ice-structure interface stresses. A simple failure model is used to predict the onset of local failure and to propagate damage in the ice until local ice shedding is obtained. Recommendations are made on developing the model further.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2080
Roger J. Aubert
Abstract The entire process from ice accretion to ice impact with ice shedding in between still needs refinement. This paper presents key points illustrating the need for improvements in understanding the mechanical properties of ice accretion on helicopter rotor systems.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2082
Andreas Tramposch, Wolfgang Hassler, Reinhard F.A. Puffing
Abstract Certain operating modes of the Environmental Control System (ECS) of passenger aircraft are accompanied with significant ice particle accretion in a number of pivotal parts of the system. Icing conditions particularly prevail downstream of the air conditioning packs and, as a consequence, ice particle accretion takes place in the Pack Discharge Duct (PDD) and in the mixing manifold. For a better understanding of these icing processes, numerical simulations using a multiphase model based on a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport model in a generic PDD were performed. The obstruction of the PDD due to ice growth and the resulting change of the flow geometry were treated by deforming the computational mesh during the CFD simulations. In addition to the numerical investigations, a generic and transparent PDD was studied experimentally under several operating conditions in FH JOANNEUM's icing wind tunnel.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2081
Hossein Habibi, Graham Edwards, Liang Cheng, Haitao Zheng, Adam Marks, Vassilios Kappatos, Cem Selcuk, Tat-Hean Gan
Abstract Icing conditions in cold regions of the world may cause problems for wind turbine operations, since accreted ice can reduce the efficiency of power generation and create concerns regarding ice-shedding. This paper covers modelling studies and some experimental development for an ongoing ice protection system that provides both deicing and anti-icing actions for wind turbine blades. The modelling process contained two main sections. The first part involved simulation of vibrations with very short wavelength or ultrasonic guided waves (UGW) on the blade to determine optimal excitation frequency and transducer configuration. This excitation creates horizontal shear stress at the interface between ice and blade and focuses energy at the leading edge for de-bonding ice layers.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2083
Daniel Silva, Thais Bortholin, J Allan Lyrio, Luis Santos
Abstract An important issue regarding landing performance is the reference speed which determines the approved fields lengths in which a landing can take place. A critical scenario is the accumulation of ice during the holding phase followed by descent, approach and landing. The effect of icing in the landing configuration, with the high-lift devices deployed, is relevant and should be anticipated during the early design phases by simulation. Due to the complex behaviour of the flowfield, 3D CFD methods has been used by several manufacturers but that leads to a high computational cost which might be too intensive for the preliminary design phase.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2084
Benedikt König, Ehab Fares, Andy P. Broeren
Abstract A Lattice-Boltzmann approach is used to simulate the aerodynamics of complex three-dimensional ice shapes on a NACA 23012 airfoil. The digitally produced high fidelity geometrical ice shapes were created using a novel laser scanning technique in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel. The geometrically fully resolved unsteady simulations are conducted on two ice shapes representing a roughness type and a horn type icing on the leading edge of the airfoil. Comparisons between simulation and experiment of lift, drag, and pitching moment as well as pressure distributions indicate overall a good qualitative agreement in capturing the aerodynamic degradation. Especially for the horn-type ice shape, the quantitative agreement is also mostly very good. Analysis of the flow structures indicates furthermore a good capturing of the three-dimensional separation behavior of the flow.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2087
Delphine Leroy, Emmanuel Fontaine, Alfons Schwarzenboeck, J. Walter Strapp, Lyle Lilie, Julien Delanoe, Alain Protat, Fabien Dezitter, Alice Grandin
Abstract Despite past research programs focusing on tropical convection, the explicit studies of high ice water content (IWC) regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) are rare, although high IWC conditions are potentially encountered by commercial aircraft during multiple in-service engine powerloss and airdata probe events. To gather quantitative data in high IWC regions, a multi-year international HAIC/HIWC (High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content) field project has been designed including a first field campaign conducted out of Darwin (Australia) in 2014. The airborne instrumentation included a new reference bulk water content measurement probe and optical array probes (OAP) recording 2D images of encountered ice crystals. The study herein focuses on ice crystal size properties in high IWC regions, analyzing in detail the 2D image data from the particle measuring probes.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2086
Matthew Grzych, Terrance Tritz, Jeanne Mason, Melissa Bravin, Anna Sharpsten
Abstract The significant problem of engine power-loss and damage associated with ice crystal icing (ICI) was first formally recognized by the industry in a 2006 publication [1]. Engine events described by the study included: engine surge, stall, flameout, rollback, and compressor damage; which were triggered by the ingestion of ice crystals in high concentrations generated by deep, moist convection. Since 2003, when ICI engine events were first identified, Boeing has carefully analyzed event conditions documenting detailed pilot reports and compiling weather analyses into a database. The database provides valuable information to characterize environments associated with engine events. It provides boundary conditions, exposure times, and severity to researchers investigating the ICI phenomenon. Ultimately, this research will aid in the development of engine tests and ICI detection/avoidance devices or techniques.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 104293