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Viewing 1 to 30 of 104151
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2096
The correct prediction of ice accretion on aircraft surfaces by simulation necessitates a good prediction of friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient. After icing process, surface roughness induces high increase of friction and heat transfer, but simple Reynolds analogy is no longer valid. An experimental campaign is conducted in order to provide a database for numerical model development in the simple configuration of a flat plate under turbulent airflow conditions. The flat plate model is placed in the centre of the test section of a windtunnel with an improved temperature regulation. The test model is designed according to constraints for the identification of friction and heat transfer coefficients. It includes three identical resin plates which are moulded to obtain a specified roughness on the upper surface exposed to the flow. The latest resin plate is heated on its lower face by an electrical heater connected to a temperature regulator.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2105
Darren Glenn Jackson
Aircraft icing has been a focus of the aviation industry for many years. While regulations existed for the certification of aircraft and engine ice protection systems, no FAA or EASA regulations pertaining to certification of ice detection systems existed for much of this time. Interim policy on ice detection systems has been issued through the form of AC20-73A as well as FAA Issue Papers and EASA Certification Review Items to deal mainly with Primary Ice Detection Systems. A few years ago, the FAA released an update to FAR 25.1419 which provided the framework for the usage of ice detection systems on aircraft. As a result of the ATR-72 crash in Roselawn, Indiana due to Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD) along with the Air France Flight 447 accident and numerous engine flame-outs due to ice crystals, both the FAA and EASA have developed new regulations to address these concerns.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2123
Eric Defer, Jean-Louis Brenguier, Jos De Laat, Julien Delanoe, Fabien Dezitter, Michael Faivre, Amanda Gounou, Alice Grandin, Anthony Guignard, Jan-Fokke Meirink, Jean-Marc Moisselin, Frederic Parol, Claudine Vanbauce
J.-L. Brenguier (1), J. De Laat (2), P. De Valk (2), E. Defer (3), J. Delanoë (3), F. Dezitter (4), M. Faivre (3), A. Gounou (1), A. Grandin (4), A. Guignard (3), J. F. Meirink (2), J.-M. Moisselin (1), F. Parol (3), C. Vanbauce (3) 1 - Météo-France 2 - KNMI 3 - CNRS 4 - AIRBUS The European FP7 High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) project aims at characterizing specific environmental conditions in the vicinity of convective clouds that can lead to in-service events [1]. Academics and aeronautic industries are collaborating within 6 main research activities that include dedicated field campaigns, development of new in situ probes, space-based detection and monitoring, upgrade of on-board weather radars, improvement of ground test facilities, and modeling of melting and impingement processes. All activities are designed to enhance aircraft safety when flying in mixed phase and glaciated icing conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2112
Thomas Schlegl, Michael Moser, Hubert Zangl
We present a system of completely autarkic temperature and capacitive icing sensors for aircraft. The consequences of icing on aircraft are described, for example, in [1] and [2]. Flexible (i.e. bendable) sensors, which are truly wireless and do not require maintenance, are easily mounted to almost any point on the aircraft surface (e.g. wings, fuselage, rudder, elevator, etc.). The entire sensing unit has a size of less than 100 mm times 170 mm (3.397 in times 6.693 in). The overall thickness can be kept lower than 2 mm (0.079 in) at the current status of development. It comprises the sensor front-end, processing electronics, buffered solar harvesting and a low-power radio frequency transmitter. The system transmits measurement results via an RF link to a monitoring system, which comprises a receiver antenna and a receiver circuit located at a suitable position on the aircraft. The employed sensor principle was first suggested in [3].
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2109
Rodrigo Domingos, Daniel Silva
This paper outlines a three-dimensional computer model named AIPAC suitable for bleed-air ice protection system parametric studies in support of system design and optimization. This 3D simulation code was derived from HASPAC, which is a 2D anti-icing model developed at Wichita State University in 2010. AIPAC is based on the Finite Volumes Method and, similarly to HASPAC, combines a commercial Navier-Stokes flow solver with a Messinger model based thermodynamic analysis that applies internal and external flows heat transfer coefficients, pressure distribution, wall shear stress, etc, to compute wing leading edge skin temperatures, 3D runback flow distribution, and the location, extent and rate of icing. In addition, AIPAC was built using a transient formulation and with the capability of extruding a 3D surface mesh into a volumetric domain, so that “single-shot” ice shapes can be predicted (a more accurate multiple-step ice growth methodology is currently being developed).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2148
Erdem Ayan, Serkan Ozgen, Canibek Murat, Erhan Tarhan
Ice crystal ingestion to aircraft engines may cause ice to accrete on internal components, leading to flameout, mechanical damage, rollback, etc. Many incidents occur due to the engine failures especially at high altitude convective weather conditions. Thus, in the framework of HAIC FP7 European project, the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions are investigated. Within the HAIC FP7 European project, TAI will implement models related to the ice crystal accretion calculation to the existing ice accumulation prediction program for droplets, namely TAICE. Considered models include heat transfer & phase change model, drag model and impact model. Moreover, trajectory model and Extended Messinger Model require some modifications to be used for ice crystal accretion predictions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2081
Hossein Habibi, Graham Edwards, Liang Cheng, Haitao Zheng, Adam Marks, Vassilios Kappatos, Cem Selcuk, Tat-Hean Gan
Wind turbines mounted on cold climate sites are subject to icing which could significantly influence the performance of turbine blades for harvesting wind energy. To alleviate this problem, a number of techniques have been developed and tested. The currently used methods are surface coating, antifreeze chemicals, electrical resistance heating, hot air circulation, pulse electrothermal de-icing, manual chip-off, etc. Almost all thermal de-ice methods demand a high level of power to operate. Also, the high temperature induced to the blade by the thermal techniques may pose a risk for the integrity of composite blades. A relatively new strategy used for ice protection systems is ultrasonic guided waves (vibrations of very short length wave) on which a few research projects have been recently accomplished. This method is well known for non-destructive testing applications in which the waves typically propagate between 20 kHz and 100 kHz for long-range ultrasonic testing.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2100
Yongsheng Lian, Yisen Guo
This paper investigated impingement of supercooled large droplets onto smooth solid surfaces to understand the mechanism of splashing and secondary droplets formation using a novel moment of fluid (MOF) method. Previous studies have established a splashing threshold, but the effect of ambient gas in liquid droplet splashing is not fully understood. Our numerical results of water droplet splashing with relatively low velocity were consistent with experimental results: splashing occurs at high pressure but not at low pressure. Our simulation revealed that a thin film was formed after the droplet contacted the solid surface. The thin film moved at a lower speed at the contact with the solid due to viscous effect while the film moved at a higher speed away from the solid. As a result, air was trapped under the film, making the film floating on the air. When the pressure was high, the air density was high hence the aerodynamic forces by the air on the thin film.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2101
Hai Li, Ilia Roisman, Cameron Tropea
Airframe icing is a topic of vital importance in aviation industry because it is mainly concerned with the safe and efficient operation of aircraft under all weather conditions. Over the last 15 years the role of supercooled large droplets (SLD) in aircraft icing has received increased attention. Recent meteorological investigations on icing weather have highlighted the existence of icing cloud characteristics beyond the actual certification envelope defined by the 14 CFR Part 25 Appendix C: Atmospheric Icing Conditions for Aircraft Certification, which accounts for an icing envelope characterized by water droplet diameters up to 50 μm. The mechanisms of impact and solidification of SLD are still not completely understood. The main subject of the present study is an investigation of impact of a supercooled drop onto a superhydrophobic substrate. Drop impact, spreading and rebound are observed using a high-speed video system.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2092
David M. Orchard, Catherine Clark, Myron Oleskiw
As a result of a series of international collaborative projects to measure and assess aircraft icing environments that contain Supercooled Large Droplets (SLDs), it has been demonstrated that the current icing envelopes, e.g., Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 14 Part 25 Appendix C, do not adequately capture conditions where SLDs are present. Consequently, regulatory authorities are considering extensions to the certification requirements to include SLD environments. In order to demonstrate compliance to an updated icing certification that includes SLD conditions, airframe and aircraft component manufactures will have an increased need for access to test facilities that can simulate this environment. To address this need, a series of tests have been conducted within the NRC’s Altitude Icing Wind Tunnel (AIWT) to examine the feasibility of expanding its current capabilities to include the SLD icing envelope.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2122
Cameron Butler, Eric Loth
INTRODUCTION To support a collaborative research project aimed at studying icing on large-scale, swept wings, unsteady simulations were performed on test articles with and without icing in NASA Glenn’s Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The models being tested are all swept hybrid models designed to have the same leading-edge geometry as a 65% scaled version of the Common Research Model (CRM). Three models were designed as hybrid airfoils where the leading edge geometry and flow field matched that of the CRM, but the rest of the airfoil was reduced substantially in length to accommodate the tunnel cross-section. This hybrid design allows for the largest leading-edge which avoids complex issues associated with geometric scaling in icing conditions. To investigate the effect of sweep along the wing, three different test models are investigated to represent different spanwise locations along the CRM, from inboard, mid-span and outboard.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2129
Andrea Munzing, Stephane Catris
A lot of research work on icing scaling laws has been done during the last decades resulting in a today commonly accepted definition of similarity parameters and scaling laws. Those icing scaling laws have essentially been developed for fixed wing applications because airplane aerodynamic surfaces are too big to be tested in icing wind tunnels. This problem does not exist for helicopter blade profiles. However, the use of icing scaling laws is a very interesting feature in order to be able to predict ice shapes or icing performance penalty for a future helicopter still in development. Thanks to the long experience of Airbus Helicopters with icing tests a database of several real ice shapes on helicopter main and tail rotor blade sections is available. The comparison of the ice shapes obtained at the same icing similarity parameters allows the assessment of 2D icing scaling laws established for fixed wing aircrafts.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2134
Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki
There is significant recent evidence that ice crystals ingested by a jet engine at high altitude can partially melt and then accrete within the forward stages of the compressor, potentially producing a loss of performance, rollback, combustor flameout, compressor damage, etc. Several studies of this ice crystal icing (ICI) phenomenon have been conducted in the past 5 years using the RATFac (Research Altitude Test Facility) altitude chamber at the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC), which includes an icing wind tunnel capable at operating at Mach numbers (M), total pressures (po) and temperatures (To) pertinent to ICI. Humidity can also be controlled and ice particles are generated with a grinder. The ice particles are entrained in a jet of sub-freezing air blowing into the tunnel inlet. Warm air from the altitude cell also enters the tunnel, where it mixes with the cold ice-laden jet, increasing the wet-bulb temperature (Twb) and inducing particle melting.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2128
Enrico Bellussi
This paper describes the AgustaWestland past and present experience in the use of US Army HISS flight test results in support to the civil ice clearance for rotorcrafts. The US Army HISS is a CH47D Chinook fitted with a spray bar system providing a cloud for in flight icing evaluation with large part of the rotor (or the fuselage) of the rotorcraft immersed during the flight. The HISS allows to have flight data with stable and partially selectable ice parameters for prolonged flight time, conditions extremely difficult to encounter during natural ice flights. AgustaWestland obtained for AW139 the clearance for flight into known icing conditions (FIPS) by EASA, FAA and TCCA in 2010 and by IAC in 2011. AW139 also obtained the clearance for flight into limited ice conditions (LIPS) by EASA in 2013. In both cases the results of the US Army HISS artificial icing trials have been successfully used to support the certification process.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2149
Caroline Laforte, Caroline Blackburn, Jean Perron
Ideally, an icephobic coating applied to ice-exposed surfaces appears to be an interesting solution to prevent ice build-up. Over the last decade, developments of efficient icephobic coatings were multiplied. Some materials that reduce ice adhesion have been developed from which the ice can be more easily shed, possibly even with existing forces such as wind, gravity and vibrations. This paper will depict icephobic coating performances of 262 different coatings and 11 grease type substrates tested over the past 10 years at the Anti-Icing Materials International Laboratory (AMIL). Since 2003, the icephobic performance is evaluated with two main test methods. A first test method was developed in regards to measuring the ice adhesion and its reduction. A second test was then developed to measure the ice accumulation reduction.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2162
Krzysztof Szilder, Edward Lozowski
Atmospheric icing resulting from freezing rain, freezing drizzle and freezing cloud droplets occurs when airborne supercooled water drops freeze on objects they encounter. This process is especially hazardous to aircraft, when the build-up of ice changes the stability and control characteristics of the aerodynamic surfaces. Ice can also be shed with disastrous consequences, if it is ingested into engines, strikes the aircraft or leads to unbalanced aerodynamics forces. Ice accretion is a complex phenomenon involving 3-D multi-phase flow, heat transfer, and gravitational, viscous, surface tension and shear forces. An ability to predict how ice accretes on engineering structures is essential to the prediction of its associated aerodynamic penalties. We have developed an original icing modelling capability, called the “morphogenetic” approach, based on a discrete formulation and emulation of ice formation physics.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2114
Jeanne G. Mason, Melissa Bravin
Ice crystal icing has now been established as the cause of a number of jet engine powerloss and damage events(1). Solid water particles in the atmosphere can melt inside the heated engine, cool surfaces, leading to conditions where ice can form. This paper will show that the current statistics indicate ice accretion caused powerloss and damage events are more prevalent at cruise power than in other flight phases, and introduce data which establishes that commercial flights are regularly traversing areas of cloud similar to those which cause engine events, yet the rate of events is much less than the encounter rate. Not every cruise flight through a cloud containing high concentrations of ice crystals results in an event. The Boeing event database also indicates that for a given engine type with cruise power events, the altitudes where events occur is limited to altitudes above 26,000ft, even though at 26000 ft, the atmospheric total water content is thought to be a maximum(3).
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2135
Martin Schulz, Michael Sinapius
A designer of a new mechanical ice protection system for airplanes needs to know how much and in which way he has to deform the surface to break off the ice. The ice adhesion strength is often used as design value. To measure the adhesive strength several methods have been published. This paper presents a review about those methods and discusses the way the adhesion strength is derived. Finite Element Method is used to give a good insight into the stress state at failure for different load cases. The implication of these illustrations is that equations which use only ultimate force and total interfacial area to calculate adhesion strength miss the local stress state at the crack tip and the complex process of crack growing. Hence the derived adhesion strength may not be comparable with others, because they depend in fact on neglected parameters like specimen size, substrate thickness and stiffness.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2159
Philipp Grimmer, Jakob Barz, Michael Haupt, Christian Oehr, Thomas Hirth
The formation of ice on surfaces of technical devices or transportation vehicles can lead to several problems, like reduced functionality, reduced energy efficiency or operational safety. As known de-icing methods use a high amount of energy or environmentally harmful chemicals, research has focused lately on passive de-icing by functional surfaces with an improved removal of ice (de-icing) or a reduced formation of it (anti-icing). Inspired by the Lotus plant leaf from nature, a “super-hydrophobic” surface can be produced by the combination of micro-structures and a hydrophobic surface coating. By a hot stamping process we have generated differently shaped microstructures (cylinders, ellipses and lines) on polyurethane films which are afterwards coated by a PECVD process with thin, hydrophobic fluorocarbon or silicone-like films. PU films are suitable for outdoor use, because they are resistant against erosion and UV radiation.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2152
Earle Williams, Michael Donovan, David J. Smalley, Robert G. Hallowell, Elaine P. Griffin, Kenta T. Hood, Betty J. Bennett
MIT Lincoln Laboratory is tasked by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to investigate the use of the NEXRAD polarimetric radars for the remote sensing of icing conditions hazardous to aircraft. A critical aspect of the investigation concerns validation that has relied upon commercial airline icing pilot reports and a dedicated campaign of in situ flights in winter storms. During the month of February in 2012 and 2013, the CONVAIR 580 aircraft operated by the National Research Council of Canada was used for in situ validation of snowstorm characteristics under simultaneous observation by NEXRAD radars in Cleveland, Ohio and Buffalo, New York. The most anisotropic and easily distinguished winter targets to dual pol radar are ice crystals.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2144
James MacLeod, Michael Clarke, Doug Marsh
The GLACIER Icing Facility – Lessons Learnt in the first Five Years of Operation J.D. MacLeod M. Clarke National Research Council of Canada Rolls-Royce plc Gas Turbine Laboratory Civil Aerospace Ottawa, ON Derby, UK Abstract The Global Aerospace Centre for Icing and Environmental Research Inc. (GLACIER) facility is located in Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. This facility provides icing certification tests for large gas turbine engines, as well as performance, endurance and other gas turbine engine qualification testing. This globally unique outdoor engine test and certification facility was officially opened back in 2010. The prime purpose of this facility is for icing certification of aero gas turbines. The facility provides the aviation industry with the required environmental conditions (by virtue of its location), and the capability to meet the growing demands for icing certifications and other adverse cold weather conditions.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2174
Yuanfeng Xia, Jian Pang, Cui Zhou, Hongcheng Li, Wenjuan Li
Study on the Bending Vibration of a Two-Piece Propeller Shaft for 4WD Driveline Yuanfeng Xia1, 2, Jian Pang1, 2,*, Cui Zhou1, 2, Hongcheng Li1, 2, Wenjuan Li1, 2 1 Changan Auto Global R&D Center, Chongqing, China, 401120 2. State Key Laboratory of Vehicle NVH and Safety Technology, Chongqing, China, 401120 * Correspondence author, e-mail address: pangjian@changan.com.cn Currently, the four wheel drive (4WD) system is widely used in Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) due to the increasing demand of fuel efficiency and dynamic performance by customers. However, propeller shaft consisting of different universal joints and tubes on 4WD vehicle easily induces low frequency bending vibration. This paper analyzes the characteristics of driveline bending vibration of a 4WD vehicle and provides control methods to reduce the low frequency vibration caused by propeller shaft bending resonances.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2176
Rajkumar Bhagate, Ajinkya Badkas, Kiran Mohan
Gear rattle is an annoying noise and vibrations phenomena of the automotive driveline, which is mainly controlled by the engine’s torque variations creating the source for torsional fluctuations. In the current work, torsional vibrations are analyzed for improving comfort of the drivetrains. A 6 DOF, 1-D multibody mathematical model for the torsional vibrations of front wheel drive automotive drivetrain is developed and utilized for the optimization of sensitive system parameters for reducing the driveline rattle. Second order differential equations of the mathematical model are solved by using MATLAB and the output response is validated with the testing data. The model is further utilized for optimizing the flywheel inertia and clutch stiffness which are considered to be most sensitive parameters for reducing the input excitations to transmission.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2175
Jason Ley, Zhaohui Sun, William Braun, Jeffrey Nyquist
Vehicle driveline integration has long been recognized as a key element to vehicle NVH performance. As competition keeps rising, the consumer has also become more demanding of vehicle performance, especially in the NVH realm. However, regulations are pushing OEMs to develop lighter and more efficient vehicles; which can make traditional NVH integration solutions such as torsional or linear dampers, or propshaft tube size change both weight and cost prohibitive. In addition, the mass reduction trends at the OEM level have had the secondary consequence of creating vehicles which can be more sensitive and susceptible to modal alignment. These problems have led to an increased need for targeted, light weight, cost effective solutions that can be quickly adjusted to meet vehicle demands. This paper presents the propshaft liner development that is expanded from previously published SAE technical paper and US patents.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2178
Mohamed El Morsy, Gabriela Achtenova
When localized fault occurs in a bearing, the periodic impulsive feature of the vibration signal appears in time domain, and the Corresponding bearing characteristic frequencies (BCFs) emerge in frequency domain. However, one limitation of frequency-domain analysis is its inability to handle non-stationary waveform signals, which are very common when machinery faults occur. The common technique of Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) and Envelope Detection (ED) are always used to identify faults occurring at the BCFs. In the early stage of bearing failures, the BCFs contain very little energy and are often overwhelmed by noise and higher-level macro-structural vibrations. In order to extract the weak fault information submerged in strong background noise of the gearbox vibration signal, an effective signal processing method would be necessary to remove such corrupting noise and interference. Optimal Morlet Wavelet Filter and Envelope Detection (ED) are applied in this paper.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2179
Laihang Li, Rajendra Singh
The transient vibration phenomenon in a vehicle powertrain system during the start-up (or shut-down) process is studied with focus on the properties of multi-staged clutch damper. First, a four-degree-of-freedom torsional model with multiple discontinuous nonlinearities, under flywheel motion input, is developed, and the transient event is validated with a vehicle start-up experiment. Second, the role of the nonlinear clutch damper on the transient event is investigated in time and time-frequency domains; interactions between the clutch damper and the transmission transients are estimated. Third, a semi-analytical method is applied to a simplified and validated single-degree-of-freedom powertrain system model to examine the nonlinear characteristics of clutch damper during a slowly varying non-stationary process. Finally, analytical formulas are successfully verified to approximate the nonlinear amplification level for a rapidly varying process.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2182
Yawen Wang, Junyi Yang, Teik Lim
Due to the design of lightweight, high speed driveline system, the large displacement of shaft rotation and rotor dynamics must be considered to predict vibratory responses more realistically. In the current analysis, a lumped parameter model of the propeller shaft is developed with Timoshenko beam elements, which includes the effect of rotary inertia and shear deformation. The propeller shaft model is then coupled with a hypoid gear pair representation using the component mode synthesis approach. In the proposed formulation, the gyroscopic effect of both the gear and propeller shaft is considered. The simulation results show that the interaction between gear gyroscopic effect and propeller shaft bending flexibility has considerable influence on the gear dynamic mesh responses around bending resonances, whereas the torsional modes still dominate in the overall frequency spectrum.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2181
Dong Guo, Yawen Wang, Teik Lim, Peng Yi
A combined lumped parameter, finite element (FE) and boundary element (BE) model is developed to predict the whine noise from rear axle. The hypoid geared rotor system, including the gear pair, shafts, bearings, engine and load, is represented by a lumped parameter model, in which the dynamic coupling between the engaging gear pair is represented by a gear mesh model condensed from the loaded tooth contact analysis results. The lumped parameter model gives the dynamic bearing forces, and the noise radiated by the gearbox housing vibration due to the dynamic bearing force excitations is calculated using a coupled FE-BE approach. Based on the predicted noise, a new procedure is proposed to tune basic rear axle design parameters for better sound quality purpose. To illustrate the salient features of the proposed method, the whine noise from an example rear axle is predicted and tuned.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2184
Syeda Mahmud, Shahjada Pahlovy
Fuel efficiency can be improved by reducing the energy loss of power train and it’s components. Some estimates shows that about 14%–30% of the energy from the fuel gets used to move a car down the road and 5-6% energy is lost due to drive train. Therefore, a potential improvement of power train components can lower the fuel consumption significantly. Due to the engagement and disengagement process of transmission clutches, a frictional heat is generated which leads to some damage to clutches. Therefore, it is necessary to cool down the disks to increase the service life of clutch. An automatic transmission fluid (ATF) is delivered in between the friction disks and separator plate to cool them. Since the friction plates and separator plates are always in relative motion to each other, a shear force is generated on the fluid in the gap between the disks. This shear force generates a drag torque which is considered as a loss.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2183
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Jeff Orzechowski, Sudharsan Srinivasan
Integration of automatic engine start/stop systems in “conventional” drivetrains with 12V starters is a relatively cost effective measure to reduce fuel consumption. Therefore, automatic engine start/stop systems are becoming more prevalent and increasing market share of such systems is predicted. A quick, reliable and consistent engine start behavior is essential for customer ac-ceptance of these systems. The launch of the vehicle should not be compromised by the start/stop system, which implies that the engine start time and transmission readiness for transmitting torque should occur within the time the customer releases the brake pedal and de-presses the accelerator pedal. Comfort and NVH aspects will continue to play an important role for customer acceptance of these systems. Hence, the engine stop and re-start behavior should be imperceptible to the driver from both a tactile and acoustic standpoint.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 104151