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Viewing 110071 to 110100 of 110621
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200019
WILLIAM C DAVIDS
The comments the author makes regarding fuels, lubricants and engine and piston performance are suggested by pertinent points appearing in papers presented at the 1920 Annual Meeting of the Society. A list of these papers is given. The subjects upon which comments are made include salability of a car, engine balancing, pressure and chemical constitution of gasoline at the instant of ignition, the use of aluminum pistons, the success attending the various departures from orthodox construction, gasoline deposition in the crankcase and cleanness of design, as stated by Mr. Pomeroy; the performance of a finely atomized mixture of liquid gasoline and air and the contamination of lubricating oil by the fuel which passes the pistons, as discussed by Mr. Vincent; the dilution of lubricating oil in engine crankcases and the saving that can be effected by its prevention, as mentioned by Mr. Kramer; and tight-fitting pistons and special rings as presented by Mr. Gunn.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200020
HOLBROOK C GIBSON
Shortly after the armistice, the author witnessed the surrender of the German submarine fleet and subsequently inspected 40 of the 170 submarines first surrendered. He also inspected 185 submarines in Germany. Practically all the engines were of the Machinenfabrik Ausburg-Nürnburg four-cycle Diesel type, of 300, 550, 1200 and 1750 hp. There were but five Krupp two-cycle engines. Brief comment is made regarding the design of these engines. The author, who supervised the dismantling of the German submarine U-117 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, gives a detailed description of its engines, which were of the 1200-hp. type. This includes comments regarding materials, design details, valve mechanism, starting and reversing gear, lubrication, cooling and accuracy of workmanship. The air-compression system and some of its auxiliaries are outlined.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200021
JOSEPH VAN BLERCK
The automobile engine, as used in passenger cars and a large percentage of trucks, is not adapted to use in motor boats. It is not built substantially enough for this, inasmuch as the power output of the motor-boat engine, except during starting or landing, is always 100 per cent. In view of this and because tractor, truck and marine engines are of the same family, it appears that if a truck or tractor engine were made with 100 per cent continuous power output capacity it would be satisfactory for marine use. The author describes and illustrates a tractor engine modified for marine use. The lubrication system of this engine is explained. The respective merits of right and left-hand engines are discussed. It is stated in a twin-screw boat that it is unnecessary to have both engines run out-board; that both can turn in the same direction without causing material difference in results.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200022
ARCHIBALD BLACK
A tendency exists in most shops to assume that brazed joints cannot be successfully heat-treated. As a consequence, many fittings used in aircraft work and assembled by brazing smaller parts together are finished and installed without being heat-treated after the brazing operation. This practice causes parts to be used that not only do not develop the available strength of the material, but which are in some cases, under internal stress due to the heating in the brazing operation. Recent experiments made at the Naval Aircraft Factory show that the assumption mentioned is entirely erroneous. The author considers this matter with a view to specifying the use of steels and brazing spelters which will permit the subsequent or perhaps the simultaneous heat-treatment of the parts.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200007
G E A HALLETT
If at great altitudes air is supplied to the carbureter of an engine at sea-level pressure, the power developed becomes approximately the same as when the engine is running at sea level. The low atmospheric pressure and density at great altitudes offer greatly reduced resistance to high airplane speeds; hence the same power that will drive a plane at a given speed at sea level will drive it much faster at great altitudes and with approximately the same consumption of fuel per horsepower-hour. Supercharging means forcing in a charge of greater volume than that normally drawn into the cylinders by the suction of the pistons. Superchargers usually take the form of a mechanical blower or pump and the various forms of supercharger are mentioned and commented upon. Questions regarding the best location for the carbureter in supercharged engines are then considered.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200008
GUSTAVE A KRAMER
Engine lubrication troubles resulting from the dilution of the lubricating oil in engine crankcases appear with increasing frequency, particularly where economy demands the use of cheap grades of fuel. Unless a lubricant not miscible with present engine fuels can be produced, lubricants will steadily decrease in viscosity whenever fuel finds its way into them. The most satisfactory remedy is to prevent dilution of the oil. To prevent absorption of the fuel by the oil is a problem of engine design. In experiments made by the Bureau of Standards the absorption of fuel vapors at average engine temperatures was found to be negligible; further experiments and oil tests showed no indication of dilution due to cracking, with representative refiners' products from typical crude oils available in this country.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200009
BENJAMIN LIEBOWITZ
The five fundamental criteria of the performance of a motor vehicle as a whole are stated. Riding comfort is investigated at length with a view to determining methods of measurement of the two classes of vehicle vibrations that affect the riding qualities of a car, so that suitable springs can be designed to overcome them. The underlying principles of the seismograph are utilized in designing a specialized form of this instrument for measuring vehicle vibrations, the general design considerations are stated and a detailed description is given. This is followed by an explanation of the methods used in analyzing the curves obtained, thus making possible a standardized measurement of riding comfort. The factors determining riding comfort are then analyzed in connection with spring-development work, the most important are summarized and the preliminary experimental results of those directly determined by the seismograph are outlined.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200010
DONALD MACKENZIE, R K HONAMAN
Flame propagation has received much attention, but few results directly applicable to operating conditions have been obtained. The paper describes a method devised for measuring the rate of flame propagation in gaseous mixtures and some experiments made to coordinate the phenomena with the important factors entering into engine operation; it depends upon the fact that bodies at a high temperature ionize the space about them, the bodies being either inert substances or burning gases. Experiments were made which showed that across a spark-gap in an atmosphere of compressed gas, as in an engine cylinder, a potential difference can be maintained which is just below the breakdown potential in the compressed gas before ignition but which is sufficient to arc the gap after ignition has taken place and the flame has supplied ionization. These experiments and the recording of the results photographically are described.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200012
JOSEPH E POGUE
The progressive decrease in the volatility of gasoline due to the insufficiency of the high-volatility supply has developed a problem of efficient utilization of internal-combustion-engine fuel that requires coordination between the engine and its fuel and a technical as well as economic adjustment between supply and demand. The three channels through which this adjustment tends toward accomplishment are stated and commented upon, consideration then passing to the three main resources from which the components of composite fuels can be drawn.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200011
THOMAS MIDGLEY
The indicator was an important factor in the early development of the internal-combustion engine when engine speeds were low, but on high-speed engines such indicators were unable to reliably reproduce records because of the inertia effects of the moving part of the pressure element. The first need is for a purely qualitative indicator of the so-called optical type, to secure a complete and instantaneous mental picture of the pressure events of the cycle; the second need is for a purely quantitative instrument for obtaining an exact record of pressures. The common requirements for both are that the indicator timing shall correctly follow the positions of the crank and that the pressure recorded shall agree with the pressures developed within the combustion space. Following a discussion of these requirements, the author then describes the demonstration made of two high-speed indicators, inclusive of various illustrations that show the apparatus, and comments upon its performance.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200013
L H POMEROY
War service demanded that gasoline engines be absolutely reliable in minor as well as major details of construction; lightness of construction was second in importance. The war scope of the gasoline engine was so wide that engineers were forced toward the solution of unexpected and unrealized problems and a vast amount of valuable data resulted. This information includes recent determination of the quantitative nature of the factors governing thermodynamic performance in respect to mean effective pressure, compression ratio and the effect of volumetric efficiency; mechanical performance in regard to mechanical efficiency and internal friction; and engine balancing.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200014
LEWIS L SCOTT
It is stated that the general performance of the steam-propelled automobile has never been equalled by that of the most highly-developed multiple-cylinder gasoline cars and that it is significant that no innovation in the gasoline car has yet been able to give steam-car performance. This led to an effort to remove the troublesome features of the steam car, rather than to complicate the gasoline car further by attempting to make it duplicate steam-car performance. The paper describes in detail the steam automotive system developed by the author and E. C. Newcomb, including the boiler, the combustion system and its control, the engine and the condensing system.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200032
C A NORMAN, B STOCKFLETH
A four-cylinder 4 by 5-in. truck and tractor engine, designed for either kerosene or gasoline fuel and having the very low volumetric compression ratio of 3.36, was used. Only by suitable adjustments was it found possible to make it show a fuel consumption as low as 0.67 lb. per b.hp.-hr.; but with a slight variation in power and only a different carbureter adjustment the fuel consumption at 600 r.p.m. increased to about 1.2 lb., or 70 per cent, emphasizing the importance of knowing what constitutes the best engine adjustment and of disseminating such knowledge. The engine and its dimensions, the experimental apparatus and the method of testing are fully described and discussed, the results being presented in charts showing performance curves. These are described, analyzed and the results interpreted.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200031
C M McCreery
After stressing the importance of transportation, the possible uses of the motor truck are considered. The increased cushioning and traction obtained from pneumatic truck tires accomplish faster transportation, economy of operation, less depreciation of fragile load, easier riding, less depreciation of roads and lighter-weight trucks. These six advantages are then discussed separately and various data to substantiate the claims made are presented. Following detailed consideration of transportation and operation economies, and depreciation of loads and roads, the practicability of pneumatic tires is elaborated, and wheels, rims and tire-accessory questions are studied. The four main factors bearing upon truck design for pneumatic tires are stated and discussed; emergency equipment for tire repair is outlined and a new six-wheel pneumatic-tired truck is described.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200033
S V NORTON
The discussion is largely in regard to the ability of a truck to deliver merchandise economically under a given set of external conditions. The matter of truck tire equipment is reviewed in the light of recent experiences of many operators and service men. The general functions of tires, securing traction, cushioning the mechanism and the load and protecting the road, are elaborated and six primary and seven secondary reasons given for the use of pneumatic tires on trucks within the debatable field of 1½ to 3½-ton capacity. The deciding factors in tire choice, those affecting time and those affecting cost, are stated and commented upon, the discussion next being focused on how tires affect these factors. Considerations relating to both truck and tire repairs are then reviewed.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200034
W A DARRAH
An analysis of japanning practice as a systematized industrial operation is presented as the result of an investigation. The nature of japans is discussed and an outline given of how the apparently contradictory requirements that japans must be weatherproof, somewhat flexible, sufficiently thick to be lasting, possess enough hardness to prevent excessive scratching under ordinary service conditions and take on a brilliant finish, can be fulfilled in an ordinary industrial plant without undue expenditure, so as to accomplish the original and primary objects of applying a finish to metal parts to prevent them from too great deterioration and supply a pleasing appearance to the finished product. Adequate provision for securing a uniform product is essential. The details of this are discussed. Three ways of applying japan are explained. The considerations involved in cleaning the metal and baking japan are enumerated at some length and the methods are described.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200036
JOHN YOUNGER
The only direction in which flexibility of an organization can be considered is that of successful progress. Flexibility uncontrolled is liable to lead to retrogression instead of progression. During the war, every available unit of man-power was called into use, and all specialized intelligence was stretched almost to the breaking point. This was particularly true of the intelligence in the automotive industry. Demands were made in connection with the airplane, tanks, agricultural tractor and submarine chasers, as well as the more stabilized automobile and trucks. The most skilful men naturally gravitated to the most difficult work, in the problems surrounding the airplane and the tank, and, while in general there were not nearly enough men, the scarcity of skill was more noticeable in the older branches of the industry. It was there that the necessity for a flexible organization demonstrated itself. The first necessity was a rigid base from which progress could be made.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200035
J E SCHIPPER
The paper surveys the economic and engineering aspects of the automotive industry, so that engineers can align themselves with its future development. Better performance and longer life due to improved design and materials distinguish the 1920 car from its predecessors. One of the healthiest signs in the industry is the uniform determination of practically every manufacturer to improve the quality of his product. The designer has been forced to extend himself in getting the highest possible output from the smallest possible units. This trend is very noticeable. Conditions relating to prices, the return to peace-time production, the potential demand for cars and the present supply, and the probable improvements in cars are then reviewed, the thought then passing to a somewhat detailed discussion of detachable-head engines.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200038
FERDINAND JEHLE
Although aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust, it was not until the early eighties that means were discovered for reducing it from its ores in such quantities and at such cost as to make it a commercial possibility. The world immediately began to find uses for this material. Two groups developed; one, assuming for aluminum properties that it did not possess, thought that it would in time replace all other metals; the other, which, reacting from the first-mentioned view due to failures and disappointments, thought it had little use. It was afterward realized that much research was necessary to make aluminum a really commercial metal. One of the main aims of the automobile engineer is to obtain lightness combined with proper strength. The paper deals with decreasing the weight of automobiles by more extended use of aluminum alloys. The physical properties of aluminum are described in considerable detail and its varied uses are enumerated.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200037
ARMIN ELMENDORF
For many years plywood has been used for such automobile parts as roofs and dash and instrument-boards, but it was not until the closing of the European war that the extent to which this material was used in automobile construction greatly increased. The sudden requirement of airplanes created a large demand for plywood which would withstand the severest weather conditions. Glues were perfected that enabled plywood to withstand 8 hr. of boiling or 10 days of soaking in water without separation of the plies. Plywood as an engineering material is discussed. It is then compared in considerable detail with ordinary boards and also with metals and pulp boards, statistics and illustrations being given. The molding of plywood is considered with especial reference to employing plywood for surfaces having compound curvatures, and the limiting factors in the use of plywood for this purpose are mentioned.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200024
ALEXANDER KLEMIN
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200023
V E CLARK
Following the 1917 recommendation of the Bolling Airplane Mission that great energy be devoted to the development of means to maintain a high proportion of the power of airplane engines at great altitudes, some very creditable work was done. A recent flight test at 20,000-ft. altitude indicates a resultant marked increase in airplane performance. Interest in this development should be extended. The purpose of the paper is to indicate the possibilities and limitations of increasing airplane speed by introducing means to maintain high engine power at great altitudes. The DeHaviland-Four is selected as being, an airplane typical of present practice and the performances that might be obtained at different altitudes are approximately computed, with various assumed ratios of the actual engine power at the altitude to the total weight of the airplane in every case. The accompanying series of curves give the various coefficient results.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200026
SAMUEL R PARSONS
The paper defines properties that describe the performance of a radiator; states the effects on these properties of external conditions such as flying speed, atmospheric conditions and position of the radiator on the airplane; enumerates the effects of various features of design of the radiator core; and compares methods that have been proposed for controlling the cooling capacity at altitudes. Empirical equations and constants are given, wherever warranted by the information available.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200025
GROVER C LOENING
The annual report covering transportation by the largest British air-transport company laid particular emphasis upon the greater value of the faster machines in its service. Granted that efficient loads can be carried, the expense, trouble and danger of the airplane are justified only when a load is carried at far greater speed than by any other means. A reasonable conclusion seems to be that we can judge the progress made in aviation largely by the increased speed attainable. It is interesting and possibly very valuable therefore to inquire into the relations of power and resistance as applied to small racing machines with aircraft engines that are available.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200028
LEON W CHASE
To test tractors for results valuable to the user, the reliability, durability, power, economy and utility should be determined. Standard tests measuring tractor utility and reliability are impossible practically and durability tests would be an extensive project, but tractor and engine-power tests and tests of the amount of fuel required for doing a unit of work can easily be made. The University of Nebraska tests described were for belt and drawbar horsepower and miscellaneous testing for special cases. The four brake-horsepower tests adopted are stated. Tractor operating conditions are then reviewed. The drawbar horsepower tests include a 10-hr. test at the rated load of the tractor, with the governor set as in the first brake-horsepower test, and a series of short runs with the load increased for each until the engine is overloaded or the drive wheel slips excessively, to determine the maximum engine horsepower.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200027
S W SPARROW
The very complete laboratory tests of airplane engines at ground level were of little aid in predicting performance with the reduced air pressures and temperatures met in flight. On the other hand, it was well-nigh impossible in a flight test to carry sufficient apparatus to measure the engine performance with anything like the desired completeness. The need clearly was to bring altitude conditions to the laboratory where adequate experimental apparatus was available and, to make this possible, the altitude chamber of the dynamometer laboratory at the Bureau of Standards was constructed. The two general classes of engine testing are to determine how good an engine is and how it can be improved, the latter including research and development work.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200030
A H EDGERTON
Stating the desirability of reducing unsprung weight in motor vehicles as a recognized fact and that 75 of 100 engineers interviewed favor such reduction, the particular advantages resulting are given as improved riding qualities, economy in tire wear and better acceleration. Mathematical deductions to establish the most desirable ratio of sprung to unsprung weight are not attempted, the intention being rather to state the reasons favoring lighter wheels and axles. Unsprung weight effects depend primarily upon the ratio of sprung to unsprung weight. No data determining the most desirable ratio are available, but an investigation of the proportional weight of the unsprung and sprung parts of good-riding-quality automobiles showed it to be about 1 to 3. By constructing the wheels and the axles of light metal it is possible to maintain such a ratio, assure good riding qualities and reduce the total weight.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200029
GEORGE W DUNHAM
Motorization, as developed during the war, is stated as the greatest single advance in military engineering since the fourteenth century. Excepting about 66 per cent of the 77-mm. guns in the combat division, all mobile weapons of the United States artillery are motorized and complete motorization has been approved. The history of artillery motorization is sketched and a tabulation given of the general mechanical development in artillery motor equipment to May, 1919. Caterpillar vehicle characteristics are next considered in detail, followed by ten specifically stated problems of design which are then discussed. Five primary factors affecting quantity production, successful construction and effective design, in applying the caterpillar tractor to military purposes, are then stated and commented upon. A table shows specifications of engines used by the Ordnance Department and three general specifications for replacing present engine equipment are made.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200071
GEORGE E A HALLETT
Ignition is discussed in a broad and non-technical way. The definition of the word ignition should be broad enough to include the complete functioning of the ignition apparatus, beginning from the point where mechanical energy is absorbed to generate current and ending with the completion of the working stroke of the engine. The ignition system includes the mechanical drive to the magneto or generator and the task imposed on the system is by no means completed when a spark has passed over the gap of the spark-plug. Ignition means the complete burning of the charge of gas in the cylinder at top dead-center, at the time the working stroke of the piston commences. The means employed to accomplish this result is the ignition system. In the present-day type of gasoline engine a spark produced by high-voltage electricity is almost universally used for ignition. This high-voltage electricity is produced by a transformer.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200063
J H HUNT
A brief outline of the elementary principles of the operation of jump-spark ignition systems is given preliminarily to the discussion of the advantages of battery-type systems, and four vital elements in a jump-spark ignition system are stated. A diagram is shown and explained of an hydraulic analogy, followed by a discussion of oscillating voltage and oscillograms of what occurs in the primary circuit of an ignition system when the secondary is disconnected. The subjects of spark-plug gaps and current values receive considerable attention and similar treatment is accorded magneto speeds and spark polarity, numerous oscillograms accompanying the text. The effects of magneto and of battery ignition on engine power are stated and commented upon and this is followed by a lengthy comparison of battery and magneto ignition, illustrated with charts.