Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 121 to 150 of 109758
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1389
Ankush Kamra, Sandeep Raina, Pankaj Maheshwari, Abhishek Agarwal, Prasad Latkar
Abstract Automotive seating is designed by considering safety, comfort and aesthetics for the occupants. Seating comfort is one of the important parameters for the occupant for enhancing the overall experience in a vehicle. Seating comfort is categorized as static (or showroom) comfort and dynamic comfort. The requirements for achieving static and dynamic comfort can sometimes differ and may require design parameters such as PU hardness to be set in opposite directions. This paper presents a case wherein a base seat with good dynamic comfort is taken and an analysis is done to improve upon the static comfort, without compromising on the dynamic comfort. The study focuses on improving the initial comfort by considering various options for seating upholstery.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1384
Richard Young
Abstract This proof-of-concept demonstrates a new method to predict the relative crash risk in naturalistic driving that is caused (or prevented) by the effects on attention of visual-manual secondary tasks performed while driving in a track experiment. The method required five steps. (1) Estimate valid relative crash/near-crash risks of visual-manual secondary tasks measured during naturalistic driving. These data were taken from a prior SAE publication of unbiased estimates of the relative crash/near-crash risks of secondary tasks in the 100-Car naturalistic driving study. (2) Calculate the “physical demand” and “cognitive demand” scores for visual-manual secondary tasks performed while driving on a track.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1095
Sankar B. Rengarajan, Jayant Sarlashkar, Peter Lobato
Abstract SAE Recommended Practice J1540 [1] specifies test procedures to map transmission efficiency and parasitic losses in a manual transmission. The procedure comprises two parts. The first compares input and output torque over a range of speed to determine efficiency. The second measures parasitic losses at zero input torque over a range of speed. As specified in J1540, efficiency of transmissions is routinely measured on a test-stand under steady torque and speed [2] [3]. While such testing is useful to compare different transmissions, it is unclear whether the “in-use” efficiency of a given transmission is the same as that measured on the stand. A vehicular transmission is usually mated to a reciprocating combustion engine producing significant torque and speed fluctuations at the crankshaft. It is thus a valid question whether the efficiency under such pulsating conditions is the same as that under steady conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1098
Tatsuya Imamura, Atsushi Tabata, Tooru Matsubara, Yuji Iwase, Kenta Kumazaki, Keita Imai
Abstract Lexus developed the Multi Stage Hybrid Transmission for the flagship Lexus LC500h coupe with the aim of achieving an excellent balance between fuel economy and acceleration performance. To gain these benefits, this transmission utilizes a multi-stage approach with the input split mode as an enabler for a concept of multiple high- efficiency points. In order to apply this approach to the transmission, a shift device was located immediately after a power split device. For functioning of the input split mode electrically-controlled continuously variable transmission, the power split device is connected with the motor, generator, and inverters. The optimal gear selection of the shift device to reduce the power loss in accordance with the driving state improves not only fuel economy but also heat management performance compared with the previous hybrid transmission.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1115
Nandan A. Sawkar, Prashant Modi, Michael Fingerman
Abstract This study analyzes the flow dynamics of a fluid within an operating torque converter. Transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been carried out with prescribed torque converter motions using commercially available CFD software. The analysis computes torque converter excitation forces that predict flow induced excitations during converter operation. In this study, various torque converter designs are compared and assessed with the aim of limiting flow induced excitations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1361
Huan-Ping Chiu, Gerald Uhlenberg, Alex Wang, Jung Hsien Yen
Abstract In this study, we are presenting design considerations for the development of a LED (Light-Emitting Diode) bi-function headlight module to replace conventional HID (High-Intensity Discharge) projector modules for retrofitting or first installation purposes. The objective was to develop a projector-type module to outperform current 35 W HID light sources in both low beam and high beam, but with far less installation space. Essential features like multichip LED usage and the optical system design will be described in detail. Special care was taken for the heat management of the high-power LEDs, with optimization of the heat dissipation thermal path via printed circuit board, heatsink and active cooling by extensive Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation work (CFD). The achieved projector lumen output of greater 1300 lm in low beam and 2000 lm in high beam enables a projector module of very compact size (<1,200 cm3) to easily replace HID modules.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1116
Tomohiro Tasaka, Nobuyuki Oshima, Shinji Fujimoto, Yuya Kishi
Abstract An automatic transmission torque converter is usually used as a power transmission element, which performs the function of the torque matching and the torque amplification of the engine power output. This is referred to as the fluid performance of the torque converter, which is determined by its blade shape. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the fluid performance of the torque converter at the design stage to determine the blade shape, to which computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis can be applied. At present, time-averaged turbulence models such as k-ε (called Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes—RANS—model) are often used in such CFD analysis for industrial purposes, and are not limited to torque converters because of its appropriate calculation time. However, major traditional RANS models are less reliable for applications to complex three-dimensional flows in the torque-converter than those to simple pipe, channel and boundary layer flows.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1129
Kayoko Kanda
Abstract The frictional performance of the wet clutch used for automatic transmission is determined by the interaction between the paper-based friction material (D/C), separator plates (S/P), and automatic transmission fluid (ATF). In order to understand the impact of additives in ATF on the frictional performance, commercial ATF was modified by adding 5 types of additives one by one in a specified concentration, and the friction test was conducted for 6 levels of ATF consisting of these 5 modified ATFs plus commercial ATF.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1131
Keith Gilbert, Srini Mandadapu, Christopher Cindric
Abstract The implementation of electronic shifters (e-shifter) for automatic transmissions in vehicles has created many new opportunities for the customer facing transmission interface and in-vehicle packaging. E-shifters have become popular in recent years as their smaller physical size leads to packaging advantages, they reduce the mass of the automatic transmission shift system, they are easier to install during vehicle assembly, and act as an enabler for autonomous driving. A button-style e-shifter has the ability to create a unique customer interface to the automatic transmission, as it is very different from the conventional column lever or linear console shifter. In addition to this, a button-style e-shifter can free the center console of valuable package space for other customer-facing functions, such as storage bins and Human-Machine Interface controllers.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1132
Shahjada A. Pahlovy, Syeda Mahmud, Masamitsu KUBOTA, Makoto Ogawa, Norio Takakura
Abstract Reduction of the drag torque and longevity of the clutch assembly are the most important factors for vehicle transmission improvement. The decreasing trend of the drag torque with speed after its peak is a common characteristic of the clutch assembly. Several theoretical models have been presented by the researchers describing the drag torque characteristics at lower clutch speed region. However, very little study has been made on the drag torque behavior at very high clutch speed region (6000~10000+ rpm). The unwanted occurrence of drag torque jump up at high speed operating condition remains unexplained till date. In this paper, we have investigated the possible reasons of torque jump up at high rotation speed and solution to overcome this problem.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1134
Taechung Kim, Jaret Villarreal, Luke Rippelmeyer
Abstract Automotive automatic transmissions have multiple axis configurations in which planetary gears transmit torque to a counter gear on another axis. Although general characteristics of a planetary gear (component level) have been studied, no specific investigations are available in literature explaining interactions between planetary and torque-transmitting gears (Full Unit or Sub-System). In this paper, a system FEA model (Using TM3D) of a Ravigneaux and a counter gear pair is introduced, exploring influences of system deflection in pinion load sharing to changes in gear root stress pattern. Additionally, by a series of strain gauge tests under a controlled test jig, reliability of the FEA model is verified. Finally, benefits of system-level FEA are explained by macro/micro-geometry optimization in the early design stage.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1139
Syeda Faria Mahmud, Shahjada Pahlovy, Masamitsu Kubota, Makoto Ogawa, Norio Takakura
Abstract Reduction of drag torque is a crucial demand for improvement of transmission efficiency and fuel economy. In the low speed range, the drag torque at first increases with speed until it reaches a peak point, and then it starts decreasing sharply and finally stays at a minimum level until certain speed limit. Several analytical and simulation models have been presented by the researchers describing the drag torque characteristics at lower clutch speed. However, under certain conditions, the drag torque again starts to rise sharply in the high speed range (6000~10000+ rpm) and even exceeds the peak torque magnitude of low speed. The alarming jump of the drag torque at high rotational speed remains indeterminate to date. In this paper, we presented a simulation model that can predict the high speed torque jump up at different conditions. Simulation result shows that the static pressure decreases very sharply in the oil outlet region as the speed rises beyond 5000 rpm.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1141
Bashar Alzuwayer, Robert Prucka, Imtiaz Haque, Paul Venhovens
Abstract Fuel economy regulations have forced the automotive industry to implement transmissions with an increased number of gears and reduced parasitic losses. The objective of this research is to develop a high fidelity and a computationally efficient model of an automatic transmission, this model should be suitable for controller development purposes. The transmission under investigation features a combination of positive clutches (interlocking dog clutches) and conventional wet clutches. Simulation models for the torque converter, lock-up clutch, transmission gear train, interlocking dog clutches, wet clutches, hydraulic control valves and circuits were developed and integrated with a 1-D vehicle road load model. The integrated powertrain system model was calibrated using measurements from real-world driving conditions. Unknown model parameters, such as clutch pack clearances, compliances, hydraulic orifice diameters and clutch preloads were estimated and calibrated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1130
Shinya Takamatsu, Nobuharu Imai, Koji Tsurumura, Seiji Yamashita, Hiroaki Tashiro
Abstract The renewed platform of the upcoming flagship front-engine, rear-wheel drive (FR) vehicles demands high levels of driving performance, fuel efficiency and noise-vibration performance. The newly developed driveline system must balance these conflicting performance attributes by adopting new technologies. This article focuses on several technologies that were needed in order to meet the demand for noise-vibration performance and fuel efficiency. For noise-vibration performance, this article will focus on propeller shaft low frequency noise (booming noise). This noise level is determined by the propeller shaft’s excitation force and the sensitivity of differential mounting system. In regards to the propeller shaft’s excitation force, the contribution of the axial excitation force was clarified. This excitation force was decreased by adopting a double offset joint (DOJ) as the propeller shaft’s second joint and low stiffness rubber couplings as the first and third joints.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1144
Jongryeol Jeong, Ram Vijayagopal, Aymeric Rousseau
Abstract Building a vehicle model with sufficient accuracy for fuel economy analysis is a time-consuming process, even with the modern-day simulation tools. Obtaining the right kind of data for modeling a vehicle can itself be challenging, given that while OEMs advertise the power and torque capability of their engines, the efficiency data for the components or the control algorithms are not usually made available for independent verification. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds the testing of vehicles at Argonne National Laboratory, and the test data are publicly available. Argonne is also the premier DOE laboratory for the modeling and simulation of vehicles. By combining the resources and expertise with available data, a process has been created to automatically develop a model for any conventional vehicle that is tested at Argonne.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0890
Yoichiro Nakamura, Masahisa Horikoshi, Yasunori TAKEI, Takahiro Onishi, Yasuhiro Murakami, Chip Hewette
Heavy duty vehicles take a large role in providing global logistics. It is required to have both high durability and reduced CO2 from the viewpoint of global environment conservation. Therefore lubricating oils for transmission and axle/differential gear box are required to have higher durability and longer drain interval performance.  However, it is necessary that the gear oil maintain suitable friction performance for the synchronizers of the transmission. Furthermore, the maintainability and running costs of heavy duty vehicles is very important. Regarding the gear oil needed for such good performance, both transmission and axle must have good cost-performance balance.  The development of gear oil additives for high reliability gear oil must consider the available base oils in various regions as the additive is a global product.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1400
Keyu Qian, Gangfeng Tan, Renjie Zhou, Binyu Mei, Wanyang XIA
Abstract Downhill mountain roads are the accident prone sections because of their complexity and variety. Drivers rely more on driving experience and it is very easy to cause traffic accidents due to the negligence or the judgment failure. Traditional active safety systems, such as ABS, having subjecting to the driver's visual feedback, can’t fully guarantee the downhill driving safety in complex terrain environments. To enhance the safety of vehicles in the downhill, this study combines the characteristics of vehicle dynamics and the geographic information. Thus, through which the drivers could obtain the safety speed specified for his/her vehicle in the given downhill terrains and operate in advance to reduce traffic accidents due to driver's judgment failure and avoid the brake overheating and enhance the safety of vehicles in the downhill.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1399
Bin Wu, Xichan Zhu, Jianping Shen, Xuejun Cang, Lin li
Abstract A driver steering model for emergency lane change based on the China naturalistic driving data is proposed in this paper. The steering characteristic of three phases is analyzed. Using the steering primitive fitting by Gaussian function, the steering behaviors in collision avoidance and lateral movement phases can be described, and the stabilization steering principle of yaw rate null is found. Based on the steering characteristic, the near and far aim point used in steering phases is analyzed. Using the near and far aim point correction model, a driver steering model for emergency lane change is established. The research results show that the driver emergency steering model proposed in this paper performs well when explaining realistic steering behavior, and this model can be used in developing the ADAS system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1409
Markus Schratter, Susie Cantu, Thomas Schaller, Peter Wimmer, Daniel Watzenig
Abstract Highly Automated Driving (HAD) opens up new middle-term perspectives in mobility and is currently one of the main goals in the development of future vehicles. The focus is the implementation of automated driving functions for structured environments, such as on the motorway. To achieve this goal, vehicles are equipped with additional technology. This technology should not only be used for a limited number of use cases. It should also be used to improve Active Safety Systems during normal non-automated driving. In the first approach we investigate the usage of machine learning for an autonomous emergency braking system (AEB) for the active pedestrian protection safety. The idea is to use knowledge of accidents directly for the function design. Future vehicles could be able to record detailed information about an accident. If enough data from critical situations recorded by vehicles is available, it is conceivable to use it to learn the function design.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1407
Helene G. Moorman, Andrea Niles, Caroline Crump, Audra Krake, Benjamin Lester, Laurene Milan, Christy Cloninger, David Cades, Douglas Young
Abstract Lane Departure Warning (LDW) systems, along with other types of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), are becoming more common in passenger vehicles, with the general aim of improving driver safety through automation of various aspects of the driving task. Drivers have generally reported satisfaction with ADAS with the exception of LDW systems, which are often rated poorly or even deactivated by drivers. One potential contributor to this negative response may be an increase in the cognitive load associated with lane-keeping when LDW is in use. The present study sought to examine the relationship between LDW, lane-keeping behavior, and concurrent cognitive load, as measured by performance on a secondary task. Participants drove a vehicle equipped with LDW in a demarcated lane on a closed-course test track with and without the LDW system in use over multiple sessions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1402
SeHwan Kim, Junmin Wang, Dennis Guenther, Gary Heydinger, Joshua Every, M. Kamel Salaani, Frank Barickman
Abstract The rapid development of driver assistance systems, such as lane-departure warning (LDW) and lane-keeping support (LKS), along with widely publicized reports of automated vehicle testing, have created the expectation for an increasing amount of vehicle automation in the near future. As these systems are being phased in, the coexistence of automated vehicles and human-driven vehicles on roadways will be inevitable and necessary. In order to develop automated vehicles that integrate well with those that are operated in traditional ways, an appropriate understanding of human driver behavior in normal traffic situations would be beneficial. Unlike many research studies that have focused on collision-avoidance maneuvering, this paper analyzes the behavior of human drivers in response to cut-in vehicles moving at similar speeds. Both automated and human-driven vehicles are likely to encounter this scenario in daily highway driving.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0212
Mohammad Nahid, Rezwanur Rahman, Tabassum Hossainy, Shreyas Kapatral, Prashant Modi, Joydip Saha, Sadek S. Rahman
More stringent Federal emission regulations and fuel economy requirements have driven the automotive industry toward more efficient vehicle thermal management systems to best utilize the heat produced from burning fuel and improve driveline efficiency. The greatest part of the effort is directed toward the hybridization of automotive transmission systems. The efficiency and durability of hybrid powertrain depends on the heat generation in electric motors and their interactions among each other, ambient condition, the cooling system and the transmission component configuration. These increase the complexity of motor temperature prediction as well as the computational cost of running a conjugate heat-transfer based CFD analysis. In this paper, 1-D physics based thermal model is developed which allows rapid and accurate component-wise temperature estimation of the electric motor as well as transmission lubricant temperature during both steady-state and transient driving cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1185
Patrick Salman, Eva Wallnöfer-Ogris, Markus Sartory, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Helfried Müller, Axel-Oscar Bernt, Michael Martin, Knut Schiefer, Manfred Limbrunner, Johannes Höflinger, Peter Hofmann
Abstract The continuous increasingly stringent regulations for CO2 fleet targets request the introduction of zero-emission solutions in the near future. Moreover, additional customer benefits have to be generated in order to increase customer acceptance of zero-emission technologies. Actually high costs, reduced driving ranges and lack of infrastructures are some aggregative facts for end-customer acceptance thus also for a broad market launch. Plug-in hybrids as intermediate step towards zero-emission vehicles are meanwhile in series production with partly “zero-emission” operation mode and are well accepted by customers. The project partners HyCentA Research GmbH, Magna Steyr Engineering AG & Co KG, Proton Motor Fuel Cell GmbH and the Vienna University of Technology, Institute for Powertrains and Automotive Technology, have developed a hydrogen-powered zero-emission vehicle within a national funded research project.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1180
Stefan Brandstätter, Michael Striednig, David Aldrian, Alexander Trattner, Manfred Klell, Tomas Dehne, Christoph Kügele, Michael Paulweber
Abstract The limitation of global warming to less than 2 °C till the end of the century is regarded as the main challenge of our time. In order to meet COP21 objectives, a clear transition from carbon-based energy sources towards renewable and carbon-free energy carriers is mandatory. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) allow an energy-efficient, resource-efficient and emission-free conversion of regenerative produced hydrogen. For these reasons fuel cell technologies emerge in stationary, mobile and logistic applications with acceptable cruising ranges as well as short refueling times. In order to perform applied research in the area of PEMFC systems, a highly integrated fuel cell analysis infrastructure for systems up to 150 kW electric power was developed and established within a cooperative research project by HyCentA Research GmbH and AVL List GmbH in Graz, Austria. A novel open testing facility with hardware in the loop (HiL) capability is presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1385
Satheesh Kumar Chandran, James Forbes, Carrie Bittick, Kathleen Allanson, Santosh Erupaka, Fnu Brinda
Abstract Measurement of usability with the System Usability Scale (SUS) is successfully applied to products in many industries. The benefit of any measurement scale, however, is limited by the repeatability of the associated testing process. For SUS, these factors can include sample size, study protocol, previous experience, and pre study exposure to the system being tested. Differences in user exposure can influence the usability assessment of interfaces which could affect the validity of SUS scores.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1388
S. M. Akbar Berry, Michael Kolich, Johnathan Line, Waguih ElMaraghy
Abstract Thermal comfort in automotive seating has been studied and discussed for a long time. The available research, because it is focused on the components, has not produced a model that provides insight into the human-seat system interaction. This work, which represents the beginning of an extensive research program, aims to establish the foundation for such a model. This paper will discuss the key physiological, psychological, and biomechanical factors related to perceptions of thermal comfort in automotive seats. The methodology to establish perceived thermal comfort requirements will also be presented and discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1391
Heather Bronczyk, Michael Kolich, Marie-Eve Cote
Abstract Load deflection testing is one type of test that can be used to understand the comfort performance of a complete trimmed automotive seat. This type of testing can be conducted on different areas of the seat and is most commonly used on the seatback, the seat cushion and the head restraint. Load deflection data can be correlated to a customer’s perception of the seat, providing valuable insight for the design and development team. There are several variables that influence the results obtained from this type of testing. These can include but are not limited to: seat structure design, suspension system, component properties, seat materials, seat geometry, and test set-up. Set-up of the seat for physical testing plays a critical role in the final results. This paper looks at the relationship of the load deflection data results on front driver vehicle seatbacks in a supported and unsupported test set-up condition.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1372
Bo Wang, Smruti Panigrahi, Mayur Narsude, Amit Mohanty
Abstract Increasing number of vehicles are equipped with telematics devices and are able to transmit vehicle CAN bus information remotely. This paper examines the possibility of identifying individual drivers from their driving signatures embedded in these telematics data. The vehicle telematics data used in this study were collected from a small fleet of 30 Ford Fiesta vehicles driven by 30 volunteer drivers over 15 days of real-world driving in London, UK. The collected CAN signals included vehicle speed, accelerator pedal position, brake pedal pressure, steering wheel angle, gear position, and engine RPM. These signals were collected at approximately 5Hz frequency and transmitted to the cloud for offline driver identification modeling. A list of driving metrics was developed to quantify driver behaviors, such as mean brake pedal pressure and longitudinal jerk. Random Forest (RF) was used to predict driver IDs based on the developed driving metrics.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1375
Louis Tijerina, Danielle Warren, Sang-Hwan Kim, Francine Dolins
Abstract This study investigated the effects of three navigation system human-machine interfaces (HMIs) on driver eye-glance behavior, navigational errors, and subjective assessments. Thirty-six drivers drove an unfamiliar 3-segment route in downtown Detroit. HMIs were 2D or 3D (level-of-detail) electronic map display + standard voice prompts, or 3D map-display augmented by photorealistic images + landmark-enhanced voice prompts. Participants drove the same three route segments in order but were assigned a different HMI condition/segment in a 3-period/3-treatment crossover experimental design. Results indicate that drivers’ visual attention using the advanced navigation systems HMIs were within US Department of Transportation recommended visual distraction limits. More turns missed in the first route segment, regardless of HMI, were attributable to greater route complexity and a late-onset voice prompt.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1378
Gianna F. Gomez-Levi, Ksenia Kozak, Nanxin Wang, Jian Wan, Linas Mikulionis
Abstract Researchers report an estimated 35.7 million of vehicles with touchscreens will be sold in 2019 worldwide [1]. As the use of touchscreens grows in the automotive industry, there is a need to study how driver’s arm and hand moves to access the touchscreen as well as how the driver utilizes the hardware around the touchscreen. In order to aid drivers while using the touchscreen and to minimize distractions, the drivers’ hand must be able to freely move to perform a task on the touchscreen without the trim interfering with the task. At the same time some trim may be used to support the hand and fingers while accessing the touchscreen particularly during tasks that take a longer period of time to complete. A study was performed to understand the effect of the size and the angle of a shelf placed under a touchscreen. Motion capture (Mocap) data of the hand of subjects performing two different tasks on the touchscreen was collected in the Human Occupant Package Simulator (HOPS).
Viewing 121 to 150 of 109758