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Viewing 211 to 240 of 110594
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2336
Tanjin He, Hao-ye Liu, Yingdi Wang, Boyuan Wang, Hui Liu, Zhi Wang
Polyoxymethylene Dimethyl Ether (PODEn) is a promising green additive to diesel fuel, owing to the unique chemical structure (CH3O[CH2O]nCH3, n≥2) and high cetane number. Together with the general wide-distillation fuel (WDF), which has an attractive potential to reduce the cost of production of vehicle fuel, the oxygenated WDF with PODEn can help achieve a high efficiency and low emissions of soot, NOx, HC, and CO simultaneously. In this paper, the first detailed reaction mechanism (225 species, 1082 reactions) which can describe the ignition characteristics of PODE1 and PODE3 at low temperature was developed.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2296
Andreas Glawar, Fabian Volkmer, Yanyun Wu, Adrian Groves
Driven by increasingly stringent tailpipe CO2 and fuel economy regulations, gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines are enjoying rapidly increasing market penetration. Already more than 50% of newly produced vehicles in the US and western Europe feature direct-injection technology and markets in Asia are catching up quickly. However, with the adoption of this new GDI engine technology, which is able to push the boundaries of engine efficiency, new challenges are starting to arise such deposits which can adversely affect performance. Multi-hole solenoid actuated fuel injectors are particular vulnerable to deposits left by some market fuels. In order to address this challenge, the development of a reliable test platform for injector cleanliness in GDI engines is currently underway in both the US and Europe.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2370
Matthieu Lecompte, Jerome Obiols, Jerome Cherel, Stephane Raux
Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) like Adblue® is a urea/water solution injected upstream of the SCR catalyst. Urea decomposes into ammonia (NH3) which serves as reductant in the de-NOx reaction process. However, incomplete decomposition of urea can lead to undesirable deposits formation, which can result into backpressure increase, loss of NOx reduction efficiency, and durability issues. The phenomenon is exacerbated at low temperatures and can lead to restriction or stop of DEF injection below certain exhaust temperatures. This paper focuses on the influence of the additivation of DEF on deposits formation in a passenger car close-coupled SCR on filter Diesel exhaust line installed in a laboratory flow test bench. The behavior of two different additivated DEF was compared to Adblue® in terms of deposits formation on the mixer and SCRF canning at different temperatures comprised between 240°C and 165°C, and different air flows.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2375
Akihiro Niwa, Shogo Sakatani, Eriko Matsumura, Takaaki Kitamura
Diesel engine has low carbon emissions and high fuel efficiency. However, diesel engine needs to reduce both Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) and Particulate matters (PM). To meet the demand of strict exhaust gas regulation, after-treatment device is required. Therefore, urea SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) system is used to clean NOx in diesel engine exhaust gas. In urea SCR system, it is necessary to inject the urea water solution upstream the SCR catalyst. And, it can reduce NOx applying the generated ammonia (NH3) by urea thermolysis and isocyanic acid (HNCO) hydrolysis. In this study, it focused on urea SCR system. The spray behavior injected in tail-pipe can be divided into the regime of a free spray, an impingement spray, an evaporation of liquid film and a separation droplets, and an urea water solution dispersion. Also, in each region, after evaporation of H2O in urea water solution completely, NH3 is generated by urea thermolysis and HNCO hydrolysis.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2348
Michael Clifford Kocsis, Peter Morgan, Alexander Michlberger, Ewan E. Delbridge, Oliver Smith
Increasingly stringent fuel economy and emissions regulations around the World have forced the further optimization of nearly all vehicle systems. Many technologies exist for improvement in fuel economy; however, only a smaller sub-set are commercially feasible due to cost of implementation. One area that can provide a small but significant improvement in fuel economy is the lubrication system of an internal combustion engine. Benefits in fuel economy may be realized by the reduction of engine oil viscosity and the addition of friction modifying additives. In both cases, advanced engine oils allow for a reduction of engine friction. Generally speaking, the impact of chemical additives such as friction modifiers (FMs) is to reduce friction in tribocouples which experience metal-to-metal contact. These conditions commonly occur in valvetrain contacts and between the piston rings and cylinder bore at Top Dead Center (TDC).
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2356
Hyun-Soo Hong, Christopher Engel, Brian Filippini, Sona Slocum, Farrukh Qureshi, Tomoya Higuchi
Due to strict government legislation around the world to control carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and their detrimental effects on climate change, improving fuel economy has become a major consideration in vehicle design. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) have started using lower viscosity oils as engine, transmission and axle lubricants. For example, North American heavy duty OEMs started moving away from high viscosity SAE 75W-140 axle oils in the past decade, and now most OEMs use lower viscosity SAE 75W-90 as fuel efficient axle oils. OEMs also demanded an extended drain interval to address their customer’s needs. These trends forced the lubricant industries to use Group III and/or Group IV base oils in axle oils. Group II base oils have higher traction coefficients in comparison to group III and group IV base oils. Higher traction can lead to higher operating temperatures, which can impact fuel economy and oxidation performances of axle oils.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2345
Ashutosh Gupta, Rachel Seeley, Huifang Shao, Joe Remias, Joseph Roos, Zhi Wang, Yunliang Qi
Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI), also referred to as Superknock or Megaknock is an undesirable turbocharged engine combustion phenomenon limiting fuel economy, drivability, emissions and durability performance. Numerous researchers have previously reported that the frequency of Superknock is sensitive to engine oil and fuel composition as well as engine conditions in controlled laboratory and engine-based studies. Recent studies by Toyota and Tsinghua University have demonstrated that controlled induction of particles into the combustion chamber can induce preignition and superknock. Afton and Tsinghua recently developed a multi-physics approach which was able to realistically model all of the elementary processes known to be involved in deposit induced pre-ignition. The approach was able to successfully simulate deposit induced pre-ignition at conditions where the phenomenon has been experimentally observed.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2346
Hong Liu, Jiajia Jin, Hongyu Li, Kazuo Yamamori, Toyoharu Kaneko, Minoru Yamashita, Liping Zhang
According to the Toyota gasoline engine oil requirements, this paper describes that the low viscosity engine oil of 0W-16 has been developed jointly by Sinopec and Toyota,which also conforms to the Toyota specification. As we know, the development of low viscosity gasoline engine oils should not only focus on fuel economy improvement, but shear stability and low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) prevention property should be taken into consideration. The main elements content in the formulation was determined according to the results of Toyota’s previous LSPI research and the initial 0W-16 engine oil had passed Toyota LSPI test. Based on all above, viscosity index improver (VII) with better friction reduction property was selected by the Mini-traction Machine (MTM) and the High-frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) tests.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2341
Kongsheng Yang, Kristin A. Fletcher, Jeremy P. Styer, William Y. Lam, Gregory H. Guinther
Countries from every region in the world have set aggressive fuel economy targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To meet these requirements, automakers are using combinations of technologies throughout the vehicle drivetrain to improve efficiency. One of the most efficient types of gasoline engine technologies is the turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engine. The market share of TGDI engines within North America and globally has been steadily increasing since 2008. TGDI engines can operate at higher temperature and under higher loads. As a result, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) have introduced additional engine tests to regional and OEM engine oil specifications to ensure performance of TGDI engines is maintained. One such engine test, the General Motors turbocharger coking (GMTC) test (originally referred to as the GM Turbo Charger Deposit Test), evaluates the potential of engine oil to protect turbochargers from deposit build-up.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2445
Santosh Deshmane, Onkar P. Gurav, Vipul Sahu
Today's automotive industry is facing cut throat competition, especially in passenger vehicle business. Manufacturers around the globe are developing innovative and new products keeping focus on end customer; thus customer's opinion and perception about the product has become a factor of prime importance. Customer touch points such as gear shift lever, clutch, brakes, steering etc. are thus gaining more and more importance. Car companies are trying to induce more and more luxuries in these touch points so that they impress customer and create a positive opinion about the product. On the other hand manufacturers are also trying to manage profits. Companies thus need to find the best fit solution for improvising customer touch points with optimized costs. The performance of these touch points is driven by subsystems of mechanical components like mechanical linkage.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2343
Nicolas Champagne, Nicolas Obrecht, Arup Gangopadhyay, Rob Zdrodowski, Z Liu
The oil and additive industry is challenged to meet future automotive legislations aimed at reducing worlwide CO2 emissions levels. The most efficient solution used to date has been to decrease oil viscosity leading to the introduction of new SAE grades such as SAE 0W-8. However this solution may soon reach its limit due to potential issues related to wear with lower engine oil viscosities. In this paper, an innovative solution is proposed that combines the use of a new tailor-made polyalkylene glycol with specific anti-wear additives. Valvetrain wear measurements using radionuclide technique demonstrates the robustness of this solution. The wear performance was also confirmed in normalized GF-5 testings. An extensive tribological evaluation (film formation, wear testing and tribofilm surface analysis) of the interactions between the base oil and the anti-wear additives lead us to propose an underlying mechanism that can explain this performance benefit.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2446
Pengchuan Wang, Nikolaos Katopodes, Yuji Fujii
Wet clutch packs are the key component for gear shifting in the step-ratio automatic transmission system. They are coupled or de-coupled to alter gear ratios based on driver’s demand and vehicle operating conditions. The frictional interfaces between clutch plates are lubricated with automatic transmission fluid (ATF) for both thermal and friction management. In a 10-speed transmission, there may be as many as 6 clutch packs. Under any driving conditions, 2 to 3 clutch packs are typically open, shearing ATF and contributing to energy loss. There is an opportunity to improve fuel economy by reducing this viscous drag. One main factor that directly affects clutch drag is the clearance between rotating plates. The axial position of clutch plates changes continually at every instance. It is empirically known that not only the total clearance, but also its distribution between the plates affects the viscous drag.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2434
Srinivasan Paulraj, Saravanan Muthiah
Traditionally driveline ratios are selected based on trial and error method of proto vehicle testing. This consumes lot of time and increases overall vehicle development effort. Over last few decades, simulation-based design approach has been extensively used to alleviate this problem. This paper describes torque converter and final drive ratio (FDR) selection at concept phase for new Automatic Transmission (AT) vehicle development. Most of the critical data required for simulating vehicle performance and fuel economy (FE) targets were not available (e.g. shift map, clutch slip map, pedal map, dynamic torque, coast down, etc.) at an initial stage of the project. Hence, the risk for assuming right inputs and properly selecting FDR/Torque converter was particularly high. Therefore, a validated AVL Cruise simulation model based on an existing AT vehicle was used as a base for new AT vehicle development to mitigate the risk due to non-availability of inputs.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2436
Santosh Deshmane, Onkar Gangvekar, Samson Rajakumar
In today’s competitive automobile market, driver comfort is at utmost importance and the bar is being raised continuously. Gear Shifting is a crucial customer touch point. Any issue or inconvenience caused while shifting gear can result into customer dissatisfaction and will impact the brand image. While there are continual efforts being taken by most of the car manufactures, “Double Bump” in gear shift has still remained as a pain area and impact severely on the shift feel. This is more prominent in N-S transmissions. In this paper ‘Double Bump’ is a focus area and a mathematical / analytical approach is demonstrated by analyzing ‘impacting parameters’ and establishing their co-relation with double bump. Additionally, the results are also verified with a simulation model.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2427
Suresh Kumar Kandreegula, Rahul Jain, Shivdayal Prasad, Rahul Machiya, Avinash Mandyam
Automotive vehicle includes various systems like engine, transmission, exhaust, air intake, cooling and many more systems. No doubt the performance of individual system depends upon their core design. But for performance, the system needs to be fastened properly. In automotive, most of the joints used fasteners which helps in serviceability of the components. There are more than thousands of fasteners used in the vehicle. At various locations, we found issue of bolt loosening and because of this the design intent performance is not met by the system. During product development of ECS (Engine cooling system), various issues reported to loosening the bolt. The pre-mature failure of bolt loosening, increases the interest in young engineers for understanding the behavior of fastener in vehicle running conditions. This paper focuses on the design of wedge shape of washer to avoid bolt loosening.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2431
Michitaka Yamamoto, Takayuki Hosogi, Tetsuji Watanabe, Yuki Nishida
Over the past decades, the automotive industry has made significant efforts to improve engine fuel economy by reducing mechanical friction in cold conditions. One of countermeasures is an improvement of warming up time by restricting coolant flow. Another way to reduce the friction is to optimize an oil pump function to provide minimum, but necessary and sufficient oil pressure to the lubrication system. Another challenge for the automotive industry is the reduction of exhaust emission. An oil dilution ratio by fuel and a particle number (PN) have been a recent concern. A piston surface temperature has negative impact to them. Appropriate piston cooling is an important technical issue while increasing power density of engines. In order to achieve these requirements in engines, a new type of oil pump with a function to vary the oil pressure depending on its demand was developed. An internal gear optimum pressure oil pump design was adopted first in the world.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2386
Naoki Ohya, Kohei Hiyama, Kotaro Tanaka, Mitsuru Konno, Atsuko Tomita, Takeshi Miki, Yutaka Tai
Diesel engines have better fuel economy over comparable gasoline engines and useful for the reduction of CO2 emissions. However, to meet stringent emission standards, the technology for reducing NOx and particulate matter (PM) in diesel engine exhaust needs to be improved. A conventional selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system consists of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a diesel particulate filter (DPF), and an urea-SCR catalyst. Recently, more stringent regulations have led to the development of SCR systems with a larger volume and increased the cost of such systems. In order to solve these problems, an SCR catalyst coated on DPF (SCR/DPF) is proposed. An SCR/DPF system has a lower volume and cost compared with the conventional SCR system. The SCR/DPF catalyst has two functions: one is combustion of PM and the other is reduction of NOx emissions.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2400
Yanlong Wu, Jason Ferns, Hu Li, Gordon Andrews
Hydrogenated vegetable oil (HVO) diesel fuels have potential to provide reduced carbon footprint in diesel engines and reduce exhaust emissions. Therefore it is a strong candidate for transport and diesel powered machines including electricity generators and other off-road machines. In this research, a waste cooking oil derived HVO diesel was investigated for its combustion performance including ignition delay and heat release, and particulate number emissions including size segregated values. The results were compared to the standard petroleum diesel. A 3 litre direct injection intercooled IVECO diesel engine equipped with EGR was used which has a maximum power output of 96kW and is EURO5 emission compliant. The engine was equipped with an integrated DOC and DPF aftertreatment system. Both the upstream and downstream of the aftertreatment emissions were measured. The tests were conducted at different RPM and loads at steady state conditions.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2448
Jesse Schneider, Kensuke Kamichi, Daniel Mikat, Robert Sutton, Mohamad Abdul-Hak, Yusuke Minagawa, Hiroyuki Abeta, Eloi Taha, Rich Boyer, Jonathan Sirota, Morris Kesler, Richard Carlson, Mark Klerer, Sebastian Mathar
Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) is to be commercialized in the very near future. There are however many technology challenges. The SAE J2954 Taskforce published a guideline or Technical Information Report in 2016 to help in the harmonization in the first phase of this technology. SAE J2954 is a performance-based approach for WPT by specifying ground and assembly coils to be used in a test stand (per Z-Height) to validate interoperability. However, there were two types of technologies used for the topologies of these coils in SAE J2954. The main goal of this SAE J2954 testing campaign was to prove interoperability and the guideline contained within. The main challenge is that this type of testing had not been done before on such a scale with real automaker and supplier systems. Automakers, suppliers and government employees worked together to create this test plan and resuts.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2304
Hui Ding, Frank Husmeier, Jayesh Gudekar, Amol Bobade, Deepak Patil
Abstract This paper discusses the holistic approach of simulating a low pressure pump (LPP) including test stand flow dynamics. The simulation includes all lines and valves of the test stand representing realistic test operating conditions in the simulation. The capability to capture all line dynamics enables a robust design against resonances and delivers high-quality performance data. Comparison with actual test data agrees very well giving us confidence in the prediction capability of proposed method and CFD package used in the study. Despite the large spatial extent of the simulation domain, Simerics-MP+ (aka PumpLinx) is able to generate a feasible mesh, together with fast running speed, resulting in acceptable turn-around times. The ability to still model small gaps and clearance of the LPP very efficiently enables inclusion of realistic tolerances as experienced on hardware.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2285
Eric Randolph, Raphael Gukelberger, Terrence Alger, Thomas Briggs, Christopher Chadwell, Antonio Bosquez Jr.
Abstract The primary focus of this investigation was to determine the hydrogen reformation, efficiency and knock mitigation benefits of methanol-fueled Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) operation, when compared to other EGR types. A 2.0 L turbocharged port fuel injected engine was operated with internal EGR, high-pressure loop (HPL) EGR and D-EGR configurations. The internal, HPL-EGR, and D-EGR configurations were operated on neat methanol to demonstrate the relative benefit of D-EGR over other EGR types. The D-EGR configuration was also tested on high octane gasoline to highlight the differences to methanol. An additional sub-task of the work was to investigate the combustion response of these configurations. Methanol did not increase its H2 yield for a given D-EGR cylinder equivalence ratio, even though the H:C ratio of methanol is over twice typical gasoline.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2305
Jun Yamauchi, PengBo Dong, Keiya Nishida, Youichi Ogata
With the aim of improving engine performance, recent trend of fuel injection nozzle design followed by engineers and researchers is focusing on more efficient fuel break up, atomization, and fuel evaporation. Therefore, it is crucial to characterize the effect of nozzle geometric design and the injection condition on fuel internal flow dynamics and the consequent fuel-air mixture properties. In this study, the internal flow and spray characteristics generated by the practical multi-hole nozzles with different nozzle hole diameter and injection pressure were investigated in conjunction with a series of computational and experimental methods. Specifically, the CFD commercial code was used to predict the internal flow variation under the different nozzle hole diameter and injection pressure,and the high-speed video observation method was applied to visualize the spray evolution processes under the non-evaporating condition.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2306
Xiaochuan Sun, Xiang Li, Zhong Huang, Dehao Ju, Xing-cai Lu, Dong Han, Zhen Huang
Recently, the shortage of fossil resources contributes to strict regulations of environmental protection. The research on the high efficiency and low emission of engines becomes an important direction all over the world. Technologies like high injection pressure, high supercharger and high back pressure have come into application. Increasing the injection pressure and average cylinder pressure results in the injected fuel converting into supercritical fluid, the spray atomization under supercritical condition is different from conventional spray process. This paper provides a numeral analysis of the injection and atomization process under supercritical condition in a constant volume vessel with high temperature and high pressure environment. In this paper, we establish a surrogate fuel composed of n-Haxadecath, HMN and 1-Metylnaphthalene, to analyze the supercritical injection and atomization process of diesel surrogate fuel with large eddy simulation (LES).
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2307
Yijie Wei, Tie Li, Bin Wang, Weiquan Shi
Lift-off length is the distance from injector to the location where flame stabilized under quiescent conditions on a high injection pressure direct injection (DI) diesel spray. In this paper we simultaneously used high-speed (40 kHz) schlieren and time-averaged OH chemiluminescence imaging technique to research the flame lift-off locations on a DI diesel spray in an optically accessible and constant-volume combustion vessel. Visualized temporal progression of the diesel spray that acquired from high-speed schlieren imaging system, enabled us to observe the instantaneous spray structure details of the fuel injection progress. Meanwhile the OH chemiluminescence image used to determine the quiescent lift-off length were gained from a gated, intensified CCD video camera with different delay and width settings. Experiments were conducted under various ambient temperature, ambient gas density, injection pressure and oxygen concentration.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2309
Hua Wen, Shuaishuai Liang, Peng Chen, Guangjun Jiang
In this paper, a contrast experiment has been carried out for discussing the phenomenon of fuel dripping at the end of injection by using the different nozzles with varied materials. The experiment results show that the nozzle deformation has an important effect on the fuel dripping at the end of injection. The duration of the fuel shut-off process with the steel nozzle which producing smaller deformation is shorter than the polymethyl methacrylate nozzle. The mass of fuel dripping with the steel nozzle is less. For implementing a deep analysis on the experimental phenomenon about the fuel dripping with the polymethyl methacrylate nozzle, a three dimensional numerical simulation research was carried out for analyzing the influence of fuel flow inside nozzle on the solid deformation and stress distribution of the nozzle by using Fluid-Structure-Interaction method.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2316
Yuhan Huang, Guang Hong, John Zhou
Ethanol direct injection (EDI) has great potential in facilitating the downsizing technologies in spark ignition engines due to its strong anti-knock ability. The fuel temperature may vary widely from non-evaporating to flash-boiling sprays in real engine conditions. In this study, a CFD spray model was developed in the ANSYS Fluent environment, which was capable to simulate the EDI spray and evaporation characteristics under non-evaporating, transition and flash-boiling conditions. The turbulence was modelled by the realizable k-ε model. The Rinzic heterogeneous nucleation model was applied to simulate the primary breakup droplet size at the nozzle exit. The secondary breakup process was modelled by the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model. The evaporation process was modelled by the Convection/Diffusion Controlled Model. The droplet distortion and drag, collision and droplet-wall interaction were also included.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2314
Genmiao Guo, Zhixia He, Qian Wang, Shenxin Sun, Zhou Chen
Study of the spray formation in the vicinity of the nozzle is essential to better understand and predict the physical processes involved in the diesel atomization, in detail. In this work, a long distance microscope coupled with a high speed camera was adopted to capture the spray structure at different injection pressures. The initial spray patterns were found to be different from one injection to another: It contained a clear single mushroom, tail region and intact liquid column, or had a "tail" in front of the mushroom without changing its direction and had a high speed. Occasionally, it presented as a double-mushroom shape, or did not include a clear mushroom. The difference of spray patterns may be due to the residual fuel/air, turbulent nature of the flow and the unsteady movement of the injector needle, while the reasons are not identified.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2318
Xiaoxu Jia, Zhong Huang, Dehao Ju, Zhen Huang, Xing-cai Lu
Combustion instability often occurs inside the combustion chamber of aerospace engine. Almost every rocket engine using liquid fuel suffers combustion instability problem during R&D process. High frequency pressure oscillation inside the combustor, categorically those higher than 1kHz, can lead severe vibration to engine component and cause significant engine damage in a very short time. Dealing with this problem is one of the main subjects while developing rocket engine with superior stability and reliability. Fuel atomization and evaporation, one of the controlling processes of combustion rate, is an important mechanism of the combustion instability. To decrease and control the combustion instability, it challenges a deep understanding of the underlying mechanism of fuel atomization and evaporation process. In this paper, acoustic field was established to simulate the pressure fluctuation.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2320
George S. Dodos, Chrysovalanti E. Tsesmeli, Iraklis Zahos Siagos, Theodora Tyrovola, Dimitrios Karonis, Fanourios Zannikos
FAME is the most common renewable component of conventional automotive diesel fuel offering environmental benefits when it is used in internal combustion engines. Despite the advantages, biodiesel is more susceptible to oxidative deterioration and due to its chemical composition as well as its high affinity to water, is considered to be a favorable substrate for microorganisms. On the other hand, apart from biodiesel, alcohols are considered to be promising substitutes to conventional diesel fuel because they could offer higher oxygen concentration leading to better combustion characteristics and lower exhaust emissions. In specific, according to the literature, n-butanol is a renewable alcohol demonstrating better blending capabilities and properties when it is added in diesel fuel, as its composition is closer to conventional fuel, compared to ethanol in example.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2322
Tankai Zhang, Karin Munch, Ingemar Denbratt
Reducing emissions and improving efficiency are major goals of modern internal combustion engine research. The use of biomass-derived fuels in Diesel engines is an effective way of reducing well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Moreover, partially premixed combustion (PPC) makes it possible to achieve very efficient combustion with low emissions of soot and NOx. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of using alcohol/Diesel blends or neat alcohols on emissions and thermal efficiency during PPC. Four alcohols were evaluated: n-butanol, isobutanol, n-octanol, and 2-ethylhexanol. The alcohols were blended with fossil Diesel fuel to produce mixtures with low cetane numbers (26-36) suitable for PPC. The blends were then tested in a single cylinder light duty (LD) engine. To optimize combustion, the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) level, lambda, and injection strategy were tuned.
Viewing 211 to 240 of 110594