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1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380010
E. S. Twining
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380058
O. D. Treiber
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380087
E. F. Weber
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380086
L. J. Verbarg
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380088
Walter E. Dunham
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380136
J. L. S. Snead
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380120
null, R. P. Gaylord
THE cooperative tractor tire tests described in this paper were discussed originally at a meeting of the Society several years ago. The tractor engineers present at the discussion suggested to the tire engineers that there was need for a cooperative test program to determine the efficiency of the various tire sizes over a range of soil conditions. Among the ten conclusions drawn from the comprehensive tests reported in this paper are that the most important factor affecting the coefficient of traction or tire thrust of rubber-tired tractors is the nature or surface of the operating soil; that, for a given soil, the most important factor is the weight that the tire carries; and that inflation pressure has a relatively small effect.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380122
Frederick K. Glynn
THE truck manufacturers have made available to fleet operators a wealth of truck chassis with sufficient models and interchangeability of units to create special models to meet any transportation job requirements no matter how particular or peculiar. Within reasonable limits, the first costs of these chassis are indicative of relative chassis strength, durability, and ability. The selection of a chassis cannot be made from first cost or from operating cost expectancy alone, for these two go hand-in-hand to form the total cost and either may be increased with impunity if the overall cost of transporting the product is thereby decreased. One of the most important requirements in the selection of a chassis is a thorough operation and transportation job-analysis. Other considerations include availability of service, inherent safety, legal limitations, and appearance.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380132
Gavin W. Laurie
MAINTENANCE economy is seldom a realization unless sufficient consideration has been given to the major factors entering into the cause for maintenance. The expenditures necessary to correct normal wear conditions often represent a very small portion of the total maintenance cost. The operator is presented too frequently with the problem necessitating design corrections before the truck has operated many thousand miles. The responsibility for failures of this nature may rest with either the purchaser or the manufacturer. The purchaser may, due to insufficient thought having been given to the contemplated assignment of the truck, misinform the manufacturer as to the load to be carried or the terrain to be traversed; or his appropriation for purchase may be insufficient for a suitable piece of equipment. The manufacturer, on the other hand, may accept the order, knowing that he cannot furnish suitable equipment.
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380131
B. B. Bachman
AFTER tying in truck development with that of passenger cars, this paper differentiates between “engine-under-the-seat” and “cab-over-engine” types, lists the advantages and disadvantages of each, and discusses their design features. A comparison of these types with trucks of conventional design is made by contrasting specific data, such as capacities and dimensions.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370096
E. A. Mallett
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370094
R. Cass
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370116
F. A. Brooks
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370112
Joseph A. Anglada
This paper contains a general discussion of the trends of truck construction touching upon such subjects as cab over engine, six wheel, and all wheel driven vehicles. Comments are made on various parts, such as axles, engines, etc. A comparison of English truck design as affected by legal requirements and design as affected by S.A.E. proposed standards of weight and size limitations is included.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370111
Billings Wilson
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370132
R. J. Minshall, John K. Ball, F. P. Laudan
THIS paper contains a general discussion of the problems involved in arriving at the final design of large airplanes having gross weights of 35,000 lb. up to approximately 100,000 lb. It deals with certain aerodynamic features that evidence themselves when airplanes are increased to the sizes just noted. Comments are made on wing-taper airfoil sections and the possibility of increasing the L/D in large airplanes, and on certain factors that enter into the control of large airplanes. A rather detailed account of structural considerations is undertaken; it shows the methods used by the aircraft designer in scaling up his ideas from airplanes of a year ago to the larger types to follow. Several types of aircraft construction are discussed, showing the advantages and disadvantages of each type. The question of strength-weight ratios also is discussed. The methods of analyzing semi-monocoque and pure monocoque structures are reviewed, and examples are given of the analysis procedure.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370144
B. B. Bachman
THE author makes a brief recapitulation of the paper that was presented at the Metropolitan Section of the Society last spring and carries through an analysis of reports that have been received on the operation of some 30 of these units both in the East and on the West Coast. The discussion covers the general operating characteristics of these units together with a further study of a comparison between two Diesel units and a gasoline unit from the basis of operating cost.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370155
T. C. Smith
BY means of representative cases this paper shows some of the marked developments in utility fleets in the past 41 years. Among the examples discussed are a horse-powered truck of 1896, one of the first motor trucks used for the purpose in 1910, a number of light modern “mosquito-fleet” units adapted for special applications from light-weight passenger cars, heavier units with five- or seven-man cabs, and highly specialized units for erecting poles and pulling-in underground cables with their trailers and auxiliary equipment. Considerable technical information on the design and construction of these special bodies and their auxiliary equipment is presented. In conclusion the author recommends four general objectives for consideration in rebuilding a fleet.
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370024
George McCarroll
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370040
A. R. Walker
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370047
J. G. SWAIN
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370055
J. A. HARVEY
1937-01-01
Technical Paper
370081
B. B. Bachman
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360135
Austin M. Wolf
BOTH the tractor-semi-trailer and the six-wheel vehicle have the same number of axles and wheels and each has its own particular advantages. They are seldom competitive if the transportation problem is analyzed properly and legislation does not unduly oppress either. The six-wheeler has the advantage over the tractor-semi-trailer of weight saving, more traction if four driving wheels are used, lower insurance rates, and it is free from any “jack-knifing” proclivities. The chief distinction in the construction of six-wheelers depends upon the types of axles used, whether they be dead or driving. There are five classifications in use today, ranging in various combinations all the way from three driving axles to one. The rear bogie unit may have two driving axles or a driving and a trailing axle. There is a natural resistance to turning in a bogie unit since the wheels do not roll tangentially when the vehicle travels around a curve.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360148
Frank R. Fageol
THE successful development of the chassisless motorcoach and its relation to safety, weight reduction and automotive design are discussed by the author. Pioneer design of this type, made back in 1927 after encountering various difficulties with conventional frames, was followed by successive improvements in design, resulting in the highly developed unit of today. A study is included of the engineering fundamentals primarily involved in the integral or chassisless design versus conventional-frame design from a strength and weight standpoint. This study involves a comparison with other more concrete objects to establish a definite insight to the why and wherefore of these structural changes. The relation to body safety design and its interconnection to weight distribution, vehicle balance, and resistance to crushing are also covered by the author.
1936-01-01
Technical Paper
360064
MURRAY AITKEN
Viewing 7591 to 7620 of 7721